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The five GOP senators who voted to call witnesses

Five Senate Republicans voted with Democrats to allow witnesses in former President TrumpDonald TrumpGraham: 'I could not disagree more' with Trump support of Afghanistan troop withdrawal GOP believes Democrats handing them winning 2022 campaign Former GOP operative installed as NSA top lawyer resigns MORE's impeachment trial, a curveball that has thrown the timeline for the proceedings into limbo.

In a surprise move, the Senate voted 55-45 on Saturday to allow debates and votes on calling specific witnesses after Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinCapitol Police watchdog paints damning picture of Jan. 6 failures The Hill's Morning Report - Biden officials brace for worst despite vaccine data Political fireworks fuel DC statehood hearing MORE (D-Md.), the lead impeachment manager, said that House Democrats wanted to call Rep. Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerRepublicans who backed Trump impeachment see fundraising boost Lawmakers urge Capitol Police release IG report on riot House Republicans who backed Trump impeachment warn Democrats on Iowa election challenge MORE (R-Wash.).

Beutler has called for other people who have information on the Jan. 6 riot at the center of Trump's trial to come forward, including former Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceGOP believes Democrats handing them winning 2022 campaign Secret Facebook groups of special operations officers include racist comments, QAnon posts: report Oddsmakers say Harris, not Biden, most likely to win 2024 nomination, election MORE, who was in the Capitol during the mob attack. Members of the mob were recorded calling for Pence's hanging.

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The Washington Republican also said Trump during the attack told House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyKinzinger: Republicans who join 'America First' caucus should be stripped of committees McCarthy: GOP not the party of 'nativist dog whistles' Pro-Trump lawmakers form caucus promoting 'Anglo-Saxon political traditions' MORE (R-Calif.) that the rioters were more concerned about the 2020 presidential election vote count than McCarthy was. Trump for weeks made baseless accusations that widespread voter fraud had cost him the election before Jan. 6, when lawmakers were evacuated during an Electoral College vote count. 

In the impeachment trial, the Senate is now trying to work out how to proceed, including if it can reach a deal on which specific witnesses to call. The decision to move forward at all with allowing witnesses is a surprise twist after senators in both parties said they expected the trial to wrap by Saturday afternoon.

Here are the five GOP senators who voted to allow witnesses:

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTrump looms over Senate's anti-Asian hate crimes battle Moderates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senate confirms Mallory to lead White House environment council | US emissions dropped 1.7 percent in 2019 | Interior further delays Trump rule that would make drillers pay less to feds MORE (Maine)

Collins, a moderate reelected last year, was the first Republican to vote on Saturday to back the request for witnesses.

Collins is a swing vote who has been critical of Trump’s rhetoric on Jan. 6. She also broke with her party during Trump’s first impeachment trial to support an unsuccessful request for witnesses.

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Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham: 'I could not disagree more' with Trump support of Afghanistan troop withdrawal Wall Street spent .9B on campaigns, lobbying in 2020 election: study Biden aide: Ability to collect daily intel in Afghanistan 'will diminish' MORE (S.C.) 

Graham initially voted against allowing witnesses.

But after it became apparent the idea had the support of a majority of their chamber, he flipped his vote to yes.

Graham’s decision is likely tied to his threat that Trump’s impeachment team will try to call a laundry list of witnesses if Democrats opened the door to depositions.

“If you want a delay, it will be a long one with many, many witnesses,” he tweeted Saturday.

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiRepublicans who backed Trump impeachment see fundraising boost Moderates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring MORE (Alaska)

Murkowski, a moderate up for reelection next year, was the first GOP senator to call on Trump to resign.

Murkowski previously voted to acquit Trump during his 2020 trial and opposed additional witnesses, saying at the time: "I don’t believe the continuation of this process will change anything.”

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyBiden to hold second meeting with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure For a win on climate, let's put our best player in the game Personal security costs for anti-Trump lawmakers spiked post-riot MORE (Utah)

Romney was the only GOP Senator to support one of the articles of impeachment against Trump in 2020, and he has been one of Trump’s most consistent critics within the Senate Republican caucus.

Romney told reporters shortly before Saturday’s vote that he would support requests for witnesses.

“I will support additional witnesses if the counsel on either side wishes to call witnesses,” he said.

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Sen. Ben SasseBen SasseToomey warns GOP colleagues to stay away from earmarks Bipartisan lawmakers signal support for Biden cybersecurity picks To encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision MORE (Neb.)

Sasse was the first GOP senator to say he was open to considering articles of impeachment from the House.

Sasse is considered a 2024 contender but has pushed back strongly against efforts by Trump and GOP Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrump looms over Senate's anti-Asian hate crimes battle Republicans who backed Trump impeachment see fundraising boost US has seen 45 mass shootings in the past month MORE (Texas) and Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyRepublicans who backed Trump impeachment see fundraising boost Hillicon Valley: Biden administration sanctions Russia for SolarWinds hack, election interference The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring MORE (Mo.), who also have White House ambitions, to overturn the 2020 election.

Sasse was one of six GOP senators who voted to find the trial constitutional.

--Updated on Feb. 14 at 12:22 p.m.