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Bipartisan group of senators introduces bill to rein in Biden's war powers

Bipartisan group of senators introduces bill to rein in Biden's war powers
© Greg Nash

A bipartisan group of senators introduced a bill on Wednesday to repeal two military authorizations, effectively curbing President BidenJoe BidenObama, Clinton reflect on Mondale's legacy Biden, Harris commend Mondale in paving the way for female VP Mondale in last message to staff: 'Joe in the White House certainly helps' MORE’s war powers.

The bill, spearheaded by Sens. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineSenators in the dark on parliamentarian's decision Progressives put Democrats on defense Senators reintroduce bill to block NATO withdrawal MORE (D-Va.) and Todd YoungTodd Christopher Young'Building Back Better' requires a new approach to US science and technology To encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision Senate Republicans voice opposition to Biden on Iran MORE (R-Ind.), would repeal the 1991 and 2002 authorizations for the use of military force (AUMF), which both deal with Iraq.

The bill comes as lawmakers have voiced frustration about a lack of consultation with Congress over the United States' strikes last week in Syria, marking the first known military action ordered by Biden. The administration didn’t cite either authorization for those actions.

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“Last week’s airstrikes in Syria show that the Executive Branch, regardless of party, will continue to stretch its war powers,” Kaine said in a statement.

“I call on Congress to promptly take up this measure and for the Biden Administration to support it to finally show the American people that the Article I and II branches can work together on these issues,” he added.

Young added that Congress has been “operating on autopilot” when it comes to authorizing military force.

“Congress must not shy away from this debate and I look forward to working with my colleagues on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to advance this important legislation,” he added.

In addition to Kaine and Young, Sens. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthTrump looms over Senate's anti-Asian hate crimes battle Lawmakers demand justice for Adam Toledo: 'His hands were up. He was unarmed' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring MORE (D-Ill.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeHillicon Valley: Apple approves Parler's return to App Store | White House scales back response to SolarWinds, Microsoft incidents | Pressure mounts on DHS over relationship with Clearview AI 15 Senate Republicans pledge to oppose lifting earmark ban Apple approves Parler's return to App Store MORE (R-Utah), Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsAdvocacy groups pushing Biden to cancel student debt for disabled Senators in the dark on parliamentarian's decision Sunday shows preview: Russia, US exchange sanctions; tensions over policing rise; vaccination campaign continues MORE (D-Del.), Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleySenate aims to pass anti-Asian hate crimes bill this week 'Real Housewives of the GOP' — Wannabe reality show narcissists commandeer the party This week: Democrats move on DC statehood MORE (R-Iowa), Dick DurbinDick DurbinWhite House defends 'aspirational' goal of 62,500 refugees Biden on refugee cap: 'We couldn't do two things at once' For a win on climate, let's put our best player in the game MORE (D-Ill.) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard Paul15 Senate Republicans pledge to oppose lifting earmark ban The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring Anti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle MORE (R-Ky.) are backing the bill.

Senators have tried for years to reform or repeal the existing military authorizations, but the legislation has gotten bogged down by partisan divisions on Capitol Hill or jockeying between the executive and legislative branches.

Kaine said he informed the White House during a call this week about his bill. He noted while they didn’t make any commitments, they seemed “really willing to engage.”