2024 GOP White House hopefuls lead opposition to Biden Cabinet

2024 GOP White House hopefuls lead opposition to Biden Cabinet
© Greg Nash

A slate of potential 2024 White House hopefuls are leading the opposition among Republican senators to President BidenJoe BidenHouse Republican calls second bout of COVID-19 'far more challenging' Conflicting school mask guidance sparks confusion Biden: Pathway to citizenship in reconciliation package 'remains to be seen' MORE's Cabinet nominees.

Of the 21 Cabinet nominations confirmed by the Senate since Jan. 20, GOP Sen. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyAtlanta-area spa shootings suspect set to be arraigned Noem to travel to South Carolina for early voting event Competition laws could be a death knell for startup mergers and acquisitions MORE (Mo.) has voted the most against the president's picks, according to data compiled by The Hill, opposing 19 and supporting just two: Trade Representative Katherine TaiKatherine TaiBiden's trade agenda is off to a rocky start Pence v. Biden on China: Competing but consistent visions Biden's budget vacancy raises eyebrows MORE and Cecilia RouseCecilia RouseOn The Money: Inflation spike puts Biden on defensive | Senate Democrats hit spending speed bumps | Larry Summers huddles with WH team Larry Summers, White House officials meet to discuss Biden agenda Biden releases T budget that foresees decade of trillion-dollar deficits MORE, the chair of the Council of Economic Advisers.

No senator voted against Tai and only four voted against Rouse.

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After Hawley, GOP Sens. Rick Scott (Fla.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia next week Here's evidence the Senate confirmation process is broken MORE (Texas) have opposed 18 of Biden's Cabinet nominees, while Sen. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonEx-Rep. Abby Finkenauer running for Senate in Iowa Poll: Trump leads 2024 GOP primary trailed by Pence, DeSantis Republicans raise concerns about Olympians using digital yuan during Beijing Games MORE (Ark.) has opposed 17.

Each of the three, like Hawley, are viewed as potential 2024 White House contenders.

Hawley, who supported challenges to the 2020 election results in Congress, told CNN that he was taking Biden's Cabinet picks "one at a time."

"If there is someone I think will be good to Missouri, that I can defend to my voters, somebody who I think is going to be good for the job, I'll vote for them," Hawley said last month

Scott's office said in a statement that the Florida senator — who chairs the National Republican Senatorial Committee and supported challenging Biden's win in Pennsylvania — has spoken with all of the Cabinet picks before they received votes on the Senate floor.

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"Throughout this process, Senator Scott has been clear that he will not vote for any nominee who supports raising taxes or backs a job-killing agenda. He also does not support nominees who seek to re-join the disastrous Iran Deal, resume Obama-Biden era appeasement policies toward Cuba or establish weak policies that allow the U.S. to be taken advantage of by Communist China," his office said.

In some cases, the opposition to Biden's Cabinet nominees opens up splits among Republicans from the same state.

Cruz, who led the challenge to Arizona's November results, has supported just three of Biden's Cabinet picks while Sen. John CornynJohn CornynDACA court ruling puts weight of immigration reform on Democrats Schumer feels pressure from all sides on spending strategy Data reveal big opportunity to finish the vaccine job MORE (R-Texas) has voted for 15, including Attorney General Merrick GarlandMerrick GarlandHas Trump beaten the system? Biden administration moves to withdraw death penalty requests in seven cases Federal gun trafficking strike forces launched in five cities MORE, Director of National Intelligence Avril HainesAvril HainesDemocrats call for DOJ, FBI to declassify 9/11 intelligence related to Saudi Arabia The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - GOP torpedoes election bill; infrastructure talks hit snag FBI warns lawmakers of violence from QAnon conspiracy theorists MORE and Treasury Secretary Janet YellenJanet Louise YellenOn The Money: Yellen to Congress: Raise the debt ceiling or risk 'irreparable harm' | Frustration builds as infrastructure talks drag Yellen to Congress: Raise the debt ceiling or risk 'irreparable harm' Africa doesn't deserve last place in the vaccine race MORE, all of whom Cruz voted against.

Cornyn told Texas reporters during a conference call last month that the "new president should be able to pick, within the limits, the people he wants in his Cabinet.” 

Similarly while Hawley has opposed 19 of Biden's Cabinet picks, Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntThe Hill's Morning Report - Will Schumer back down on his deadline? GOP fumes over Schumer hardball strategy Cybersecurity bills gain new urgency after rash of attacks MORE (Mo.), a member of GOP leadership who is retiring at the end of the 117th Congress, has opposed only five.

Biden's picks didn't face the biggest opposition just from Republicans who will want to defeat him, if he runs for reelection in 2024.

Sen. Tommy Tuberville (R-Ala.) ranked fifth among Senate Republicans in opposing the most Cabinet picks at 15. Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyNational Guard cancels trainings after Congress fails to reimburse for Capitol riot deployment This week: Senate faces infrastructure squeeze GOP seeks to make Biden synonymous with inflation MORE (R-Ala.), who is at the center of deals to fund the government, voted against 14, along with Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP Rep. Cawthorn says he wants to 'prosecute' Fauci Writer: Fauci, Paul clash shouldn't distract from probe into COVID-19 origins S.E. Cupp: 'The politicization of science and health safety has inarguably cost lives' MORE (R-Ky.), who ran for president in 2016, and first-term Sen. Bill Hagerty (R-Tenn.).

The top 10 for votes against Biden's Cabinet was rounded out by Sens. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottScott: 'There is hope' for police reform bill Sunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe Noem to travel to South Carolina for early voting event MORE (R-S.C.) and Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnBiden's misinformation crackdown spotlights partisan divide on content reform White House looks to cool battle with Facebook Republicans raise concerns about Olympians using digital yuan during Beijing Games MORE (R-Tenn.), who both voted against 13 of Biden's nominees.

It's hardly the first time senators with presidential aspirations have led the charge against the nominees from a president of an opposite party.

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandEquilibrium/ Sustainability — Presented by NextEra Energy — Clean power repurposes dirty power Senators hail 'historic changes' as competing proposals to tackle military sexual assault advance Overnight Defense: Military justice overhaul included in defense bill | Pentagon watchdog to review security of 'nuclear football' | Pentagon carries out first air strike in Somalia under Biden MORE (D-N.Y.) voted "no" against 20 of then-President TrumpDonald TrumpRonny Jackson, former White House doctor, predicts Biden will resign McCarthy: Pelosi appointing members of Jan. 6 panel who share 'pre-conceived narrative' Kinzinger denounces 'lies and conspiracy theories' while accepting spot on Jan. 6 panel MORE's Cabinet nominees in early 2017, while Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTo break the corporate tax logjam, tax overinflated CEO pay Will Pence primary Trump — and win? Grassley pressured to run as Democrats set sights on Iowa MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWill Pence primary Trump — and win? Kavanaugh conspiracy? Demands to reopen investigation ignore both facts and the law Biden signals tough stance on tech with antitrust picks MORE (D-Mass.) voted "no" 19 times, according to data compiled by The New York Times.

Sens. Cory BookerCory BookerCongress can make progress on fighting emissions with Zero Food Waste Act Scott: 'There is hope' for police reform bill Kavanaugh conspiracy? Demands to reopen investigation ignore both facts and the law MORE (D-N.J.), Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyBipartisan congressional commission urges IOC to postpone, relocate Beijing Games Lawmakers urge Biden to make 'bold decisions' in nuclear review This week: Senate faces infrastructure squeeze MORE (D-Ore.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisWill Pence primary Trump — and win? Kavanaugh conspiracy? Demands to reopen investigation ignore both facts and the law 'CON laws' limit the health care competition Biden aims to deliver MORE (D-Calif.) voted against nominees, according to The Times.

All besides Merkley made White House runs in 2020, with Harris eventually tapped by Biden to be his vice president.

Democratic opposition to Biden's nominees is rare, but not non-existent.

Sanders is the only member of the caucus who has formally voted against one of Biden's picks: Agriculture Secretary Tom VilsackTom VilsackUSDA: Farm-to-school programs help schools serve healthier meals OVERNIGHT MONEY: House poised to pass debt-ceiling bill MORE.

And opposition from Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinTo break the corporate tax logjam, tax overinflated CEO pay Six months in, two challenges could define Biden's presidency DACA court ruling puts weight of immigration reform on Democrats MORE (D-W.Va.) helped sink Neera TandenNeera TandenThe Hill's Morning Report - Will Schumer back down on his deadline? Biden's budget vacancy raises eyebrows White House releases staff salaries showing narrowed gender pay gap MORE's nomination to be the director of the Office of Management and Budget.

GOP Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTransit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal The Hill's Morning Report - Infrastructure vote fails; partisan feud erupts over Jan. 6 panel Senate falling behind on infrastructure MORE (Maine), meanwhile, has voted for all 21 of Biden's Cabinet picks, and Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiWhy Biden's Interior Department isn't shutting down oil and gas Biden signs bill to bolster crime victims fund Bipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor MORE (Alaska), who is up for reelection next year, has only voted against one.