SPONSORED:

Biden to hold second meeting with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure

Biden to hold second meeting with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure
© Getty Images

President BidenJoe Biden28 Senate Democrats sign statement urging Israel-Hamas ceasefire Franklin Graham says Trump comeback would 'be a very tough thing to do' Schools face new pressures to reopen for in-person learning MORE is scheduled to meet Monday with a bipartisan group of lawmakers, all of whom are former governors or mayors, to discuss his $2.25 trillion infrastructure proposal.

The group, which is made up of five Democrats, four Republicans and one Independent, comprises Sens. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperDC statehood bill picks up Senate holdout Lobbying world DNC taps veteran campaign hands for communications staff MORE (D-Colo.), John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenGOP sees immigration as path to regain power The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - All US adults now eligible for COVID vaccines The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - All US adults can get vaccine; decision Friday on J&J vax MORE (R-N.D.), Angus KingAngus KingDC statehood bill picks up Senate holdout Senate panel deadlocks in vote on sweeping elections bill Senate descends into hours-long fight over elections bill MORE (I-Maine), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyRomney: Capitol riot was 'an insurrection against the Constitution' Immigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart Top border officials defend Biden policies MORE (R-Utah), and Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenArmy secretary nominee concerned about 'unreasonable or unhelpful demands' on National Guard DC statehood bill picks up Senate holdout US is leaving, but Afghan women to fight on for freedoms MORE (D-N.H.); and Reps. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.), Charlie CristCharles (Charlie) Joseph CristDemocrat Nikki Fried teases possible challenge to DeSantis DeSantis to hold Newsmax town hall The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Upbeat jobs data, relaxed COVID-19 restrictions offer rosier US picture MORE (D-Fla.), Carlos Giménez (R-Fla.), Kay GrangerNorvell (Kay) Kay GrangerStefanik shake-up jump-starts early jockeying for committee posts Republican, Democratic lawmakers urge fully funding US assistance to Israel The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - All US adults can get vaccine; decision Friday on J&J vax MORE (R-Texas) and Norma TorresNorma Judith TorresHouse Democrats call for paid legal representation in immigration court Immigration and border initiatives test political alliances The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - All US adults now eligible for COVID vaccines MORE (D-Calif.).

Hoeven, King, Romney, Shaheen and Crist all previously served as a governor, and Cleaver, Giménez, Granger and Torres are all former mayors.

ADVERTISEMENT

Hickenlooper previously served as governor of Colorado and mayor of Denver.

“These former state and local elected officials understand firsthand the impact of a federal investment in rebuilding our nation's infrastructure on their communities,” the White House said Sunday evening.

Monday will be the second time a bipartisan group of lawmakers meet with Biden to discuss infrastructure. Last week, he met with eight members of Congress in the Oval Office for nearly two hours.

Biden last month unveiled his $2.25 trillion infrastructure proposal, branded the American Jobs Plan, which he said will boost America’s competitive edge on the world stage and create well-paying, middle-class jobs.

The proposal calls for repairs to 20,000 miles of roads and 10,000 bridges, expanding broadband access to rural and underserved communities, replacing all of the nation’s lead pipes and service lines to ensure clean water, investing in research and development and manufacturing, and expanding access to home and community-based care.

ADVERTISEMENT

The money allocated would be spent over eight years. To pay for the package, Biden is proposing increasing the corporate tax rate to 28 percent, which according to the White House will pay for the investments over a 15-year period.

The plan, however, has received mixed reviews on Capitol Hill. The proposal includes a number of family care provisions and other tenets outside of conventional infrastructure measures, in addition to large corporate tax increases, which Republicans have expressed opposition to. Members on the right are also concerned with the size of the package.

Members of the Democratic caucus, meanwhile, are at odds, with liberals urging Biden to go bigger, while moderates are more cautious about the corporate tax increase and the political blowback that it might trigger.

As a result, Democrats are considering separating the massive package into two smaller ones, with one focused on conventional infrastructure projects, which party leaders think will have a better chance of passing with bipartisan support, and the other focused on family care provisions and other miscellaneous tenets which have received pushback from Republicans.

House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy Pelosi28 Senate Democrats sign statement urging Israel-Hamas ceasefire Lawmakers bicker over how to go after tax cheats House Republican: 'Absolutely bogus' for GOP to downplay Jan. 6 MORE (D-Calif.) said that she wants to pass both pieces of legislation by Congress’s August recess.