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Biden to hold second meeting with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure

Biden to hold second meeting with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure
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President BidenJoe BidenChinese apps could face subpoenas, bans under Biden executive order: report OVERNIGHT ENERGY:  EPA announces new clean air advisors after firing Trump appointees |  Senate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior | Watchdog: Bureau of Land Management saw messaging failures, understaffing during pandemic Poll: Majority back blanket student loan forgiveness MORE is scheduled to meet Monday with a bipartisan group of lawmakers, all of whom are former governors or mayors, to discuss his $2.25 trillion infrastructure proposal.

The group, which is made up of five Democrats, four Republicans and one Independent, comprises Sens. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperThe Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? Tensions grow between liberals and centrists on infrastructure On The Money: Yellen, Powell brush off inflation fears | Fed keeps rates steady, upgrades growth projections MORE (D-Colo.), John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenLobbying world Hillicon Valley: Facebook to resume some political donations | Microsoft says Russian hackers utilized email system used by USAID to target other groups | Senate confirms Biden's top scientist Khanna, Mace introduce bill to strengthen federal cyber workforce following major hacks MORE (R-N.D.), Angus KingAngus KingSenate confirms Chris Inglis as first White House cyber czar The Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? Tensions grow between liberals and centrists on infrastructure MORE (I-Maine), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? China's genocide must be stopped How Biden can get the infrastructure bill through Congress MORE (R-Utah), and Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenTensions grow between liberals and centrists on infrastructure Cosmetic chemicals need a makeover How Biden can get the infrastructure bill through Congress MORE (D-N.H.); and Reps. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.), Charlie CristCharles (Charlie) Joseph CristFlorida GOP candidate threatens opponent with Russian-Ukrainian 'hit squad' in leaked call: report Florida congressional candidate says opponents conspiring to kill her Florida state Rep. Michele Rayner launches bid for Crist's House seat MORE (D-Fla.), Carlos Giménez (R-Fla.), Kay GrangerNorvell (Kay) Kay GrangerProgressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill House narrowly approves .9B Capitol security bill after 'squad' drama GOP urges members to vote against Capitol security bill MORE (R-Texas) and Norma TorresNorma Judith TorresHouse Democrat says she sleeps with gun nearby after clashing with El Salvador's president Harris, Hispanic Caucus meet on Central America House Democrats call for paid legal representation in immigration court MORE (D-Calif.).

Hoeven, King, Romney, Shaheen and Crist all previously served as a governor, and Cleaver, Giménez, Granger and Torres are all former mayors.

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Hickenlooper previously served as governor of Colorado and mayor of Denver.

“These former state and local elected officials understand firsthand the impact of a federal investment in rebuilding our nation's infrastructure on their communities,” the White House said Sunday evening.

Monday will be the second time a bipartisan group of lawmakers meet with Biden to discuss infrastructure. Last week, he met with eight members of Congress in the Oval Office for nearly two hours.

Biden last month unveiled his $2.25 trillion infrastructure proposal, branded the American Jobs Plan, which he said will boost America’s competitive edge on the world stage and create well-paying, middle-class jobs.

The proposal calls for repairs to 20,000 miles of roads and 10,000 bridges, expanding broadband access to rural and underserved communities, replacing all of the nation’s lead pipes and service lines to ensure clean water, investing in research and development and manufacturing, and expanding access to home and community-based care.

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The money allocated would be spent over eight years. To pay for the package, Biden is proposing increasing the corporate tax rate to 28 percent, which according to the White House will pay for the investments over a 15-year period.

The plan, however, has received mixed reviews on Capitol Hill. The proposal includes a number of family care provisions and other tenets outside of conventional infrastructure measures, in addition to large corporate tax increases, which Republicans have expressed opposition to. Members on the right are also concerned with the size of the package.

Members of the Democratic caucus, meanwhile, are at odds, with liberals urging Biden to go bigger, while moderates are more cautious about the corporate tax increase and the political blowback that it might trigger.

As a result, Democrats are considering separating the massive package into two smaller ones, with one focused on conventional infrastructure projects, which party leaders think will have a better chance of passing with bipartisan support, and the other focused on family care provisions and other miscellaneous tenets which have received pushback from Republicans.

House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiYoung Turks founder on Democratic establishment: 'They lie nonstop' Hillicon Valley: Senate unanimously confirms Chris Inglis as first White House cyber czar | Scrutiny mounts on Microsoft's surveillance technology | Senators unveil bill to crack down on cyber criminals 'It's still a BFD': Democrats applaud ruling upholding ObamaCare MORE (D-Calif.) said that she wants to pass both pieces of legislation by Congress’s August recess.