SPONSORED:

Hawley votes against anti-Asian hate crime bill

Sen. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyNYPD Asian Hate Crimes Task Force chief: Attacks are 'not new' More than 75 Asian, LGBTQ groups oppose anti-Asian crime bill Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan MORE (R-Mo.) was the lone senator to vote against legislation on Thursday aimed at combating a surge in anti-Asian American hate crimes.

Hawley, a potential 2024 presidential contender, called the bill "too broad."

“As a former prosecutor, my view is it’s dangerous to simply give the federal government open-ended authority to define a whole new class of federal hate crime incidents," he said in a statement.

ADVERTISEMENT

The bill from Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoMore than 75 Asian, LGBTQ groups oppose anti-Asian crime bill Biden-McConnell cold war unlikely to end at White House If you want Julie Su at the DOL, don't point to her resume MORE (D-Hawaii) requires the Justice Department to designate an official to review coronavirus-related hate crimes and beefs up state and local resources.

As part of a deal with Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Health Care: Supreme Court takes case that could diminish Roe v. Wade | White House to send US-authorized vaccines overseas for first time White House: Biden committed to codifying Roe v. Wade regardless of Miss. case CDC's about-face on masks appears politically motivated to help a struggling Biden MORE (R-Maine), she changed the language on what guidance should be offered by the administration from the "best practices to mitigate racially discriminatory language" to guidance "aimed at raising awareness of hate crimes during the COVID-19 pandemic."

Hirono also worked in legislation from Sens. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranBipartisan Senate bill introduced to give gyms B in relief Bottom line Hawley votes against anti-Asian hate crime bill MORE (R-Kan.) that aims to strengthen the reporting of hate crimes and boost hate crimes data, offer support for hate crimes training for law enforcement and establish a hate crimes hotline.

Though Republicans filed dozens of separate amendments to the bill, only three got votes and each failed on Thursday to get added to the legislation.

Hawley last week voted against advancing the bill, along with Sens. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonRepublicans seize on conservative backlash against critical race theory Tim Scott sparks buzz in crowded field of White House hopefuls Opposition to refugees echoes one of America's most shameful moments MORE (R-Ark.), Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGOP resistance to campaign finance reforms shows disregard for US voters Bipartisanship has become a partisan weapon Former OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden MORE (R-Texas), Roger MarshallRoger W. MarshallStudy: Early unemployment cutoff would cost 16M people 0B Republicans introduce bill to counter PRO Act on joint employer standard Tennessee cuts off 0 federal unemployment supplement MORE (Kan.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP lawmaker calls for Wuhan probe to 'prevent the next pandemic' All congressional Democrats say they have been vaccinated: CNN Fauci on Rand Paul: 'I just don't understand what the problem is with him' MORE (R-Ky.) and Tommy Tuberville (R-Ala.).

ADVERTISEMENT

After that vote, Hawley told reporters he was concerned the measure was "hugely open-ended" and that it "mandates all this data collection in expansive categories that the federal government will collect and maintain."

"It just, you know, the ability and power to define crimes, to define incidents going forward, and collect all that data, it just seemed hugely, hugely over broad," he said.

Cotton, Cruz, Marshall and Tuberville voted for the bill's passage Thursday.

Paul missed the vote on final passage, along with Sens. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnHillicon Valley: Global cybersecurity leaders say they feel unprepared for attack | Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan | Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan The Memo: Trump's critics face wrath of GOP base MORE (R-Tenn.), Amy KlobucharAmy Klobuchar Klobuchar offers tribute to her father, who died Wednesday The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Cheney poised to be ousted; Biden to host big meeting Senate panel deadlocks in vote on sweeping elections bill MORE (D-Minn.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Energy: Colonial Pipeline says it has restored full service | Biden urges people not to panic about gasoline shortages | EPA rescinds Trump-era cost-benefit rule Senate panel advances Biden's deputy Interior pick Hillicon Valley: Global cybersecurity leaders say they feel unprepared for attack | Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan | Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech MORE (R-Utah) and Tina SmithTina Flint SmithTo reverse the teaching shortage in low-income communities, give educators incentive to stay Senate Democrats push Biden over raising refugee cap Sharpton eulogizes Daunte Wright: 'Tags of racism' have expired MORE (D-Minn.).

Updated at 4:42 p.m.