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Schumer waiting for recommendation on Supreme Court expansion

Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerIt's not just Manchin: No electoral mandate stalls Democrats' leftist agenda DOJ to probe Trump-era subpoenas of lawmaker records Democrats demand Barr, Sessions testify on Apple data subpoenas MORE (D-N.Y.) says he will wait for a recommendation from bipartisan commission before saying whether he supports expanding the Supreme Court to 13 seats.

Schumer is staying neutral at the moment on court expansion, which his colleagues Sen. Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyClimate progressives launch first action against Biden amid growing frustration Senate Democrats urge Google to conduct racial equity audit Senate climate advocates start digging in on infrastructure goals MORE (D-Mass.) and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerIowa man sentenced for threatening Rep. Jerry Nadler Supreme Court confounding its partisan critics Garland sparks anger with willingness to side with Trump MORE (D-N.Y.) support.

Markey, Nadler and Reps. Hank JohnsonHenry (Hank) C. JohnsonBottom line Schumer waiting for recommendation on Supreme Court expansion Democrats seek Barrett's recusal from case tied to conservative backers MORE (D-Ga.) and Mondaire Jones (D-N.Y.) introduced the Judiciary Act of 2021, which would add four seats to the Supreme Court, on April 15.

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“Look, the bottom line is that I’m waiting to hear what President BidenJoe BidenEx-Biden adviser says Birx told him she hoped election turned out 'a certain way' Cheney rips Arizona election audit: 'It is an effort to subvert democracy' News leaders deal with the post-Trump era MORE’s commission says about the Supreme Court and they’re going to look at many different aspects,” Schumer told reporters Tuesday.

Other Senate Democrats, however, have come out against the idea.

“I don’t think the American public is interested in having the Supreme Court expanded,” said Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetSenate panel advances nominations for key Treasury positions Democrats blast Biden climate adviser over infrastructure remarks Colorado lawmakers invite Harris to tour state's space industry MORE (D-Colo.) told Politico recently.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiNew Alzheimer's drug sparks backlash over FDA, pricing Sunday shows preview: Biden foreign policy in focus as Dem tensions boil up back home It's not just Manchin: No electoral mandate stalls Democrats' leftist agenda MORE (D-Calif.) says she has “no intention to bring” Nadler’s bill to the floor, even though it’s popular with progressives.

Senate Republicans have pounced on the idea as a subversion of the Supreme Court’s integrity, even though it’s just at the earliest stages of discussion.

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Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzBiden tries to erase Trump's 'America First' on world stage Cotton, Pentagon chief tangle over diversity training in military GOP senators press Justice Department to compare protest arrests to Capitol riot MORE (R-Texas) has introduced a constitutional amendment to require the court be kept at its current number of nine justices. It has the support of Sens. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyHouse unveils antitrust package to rein in tech giants Iowa governor questions lack of notice on migrant children flights to Des Moines Senate crafts Pelosi alternative on drug prices MORE (R-Iowa), John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoSenate passes long-delayed China bill OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden ends infrastructure talks with key Republican | Colonial Pipeline CEO grilled over ransomware attack | Texas gov signs bills to improve power grid after winter storm Republicans grill Biden public lands agency pick over finances, advocacy MORE (R-Wyo.), and Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonOvernight Defense: Austin and Milley talk budget, Afghanistan, sexual assault and more at wide-ranging Senate hearing Cotton, Pentagon chief tangle over diversity training in military Media continues to lionize Anthony Fauci, despite his damning emails MORE (R-Ark.), among others.

In a parallel effort, Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioFive years after the Pulse nightclub massacre the fight for LGBTQ+ rights continues Rubio calls on Biden to 'forcefully' confront Iran over movement of war ships Bipartisan lawmakers want Biden to take tougher action on Nicaragua MORE (R-Fla.) has also proposed an amendment to the Constitution to keep the number of justices at nine. That has the support of Sens. Mike BraunMichael BraunIU parents protest school's vaccine mandates Rick Scott introduces bill banning 'vaccine passports' for domestic flights Braun-McConnell bill would protect Americans from IRS surveillance MORE (R-Ind.), Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (R-Pa.), and Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoOvernight Energy: Biden seeks to reassert US climate leadership | President to 'repeal or replace' Trump decision removing protections for Tongass | Administration proposes its first offshore wind lease sale In Europe, Biden seeks to reassert U.S. climate leadership Antsy Democrats warn of infrastructure time crunch MORE (R-W.Va.).

Cruz first introduced his amendment in October of 2020 while Rubio came out with his proposal in March of 2019. Cruz and Rubio reintroduced their resolutions in February and January, respectively.
 
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMaher goes after Manchin: 'Most powerful Republican in the Senate' Supreme Court confounding its partisan critics Why the Democrats need Joe Manchin MORE (R-Ky.) criticized reporters last week for failing to note in their coverage that both former Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgProgressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema Juan Williams: Time for Justice Breyer to go Democrats: Roe v. Wade blow would fuel expanding Supreme Court MORE and Justice Stephen BreyerStephen BreyerSupreme Court confounding its partisan critics Gorsuch, Thomas join liberal justices in siding with criminal defendant Senate confirms Biden's first judicial nominee MORE, two of the most influential liberals to sit on the high court in two decades, both opposed expanding the Supreme Court.  
 
“Nine seems to be a good number. It’s been that way for a long time,” Ginsburg told NPR in an interview aired in 2019.