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DC statehood bill picks up Senate holdout

A bill to make the District of Columbia the country’s 51st state is picking up support from a key Democratic holdout in the Senate. 

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenCosmetic chemicals need a makeover How Biden can get the infrastructure bill through Congress Pelosi: 'No intention' of abandoning Democrats' infrastructure goals MORE (D-N.H.) signed on as the 45th co-sponsor of the bill. It’s a boost from when Democrats reintroduced the bill earlier this year with 38 co-sponsors, which set a record at the time for the most support the bill had gotten in the Senate. 

Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperThis week: Democrats face fractures in spending fight Progressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema Democrats wary of emerging bipartisan infrastructure deal MORE (D-Del.), who has been leading work on the bill in the Senate, touted Shaheen’s endorsement as a clear sign of momentum for the bill. 

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“We have a moral obligation to see this through for our fellow Americans reside in D.C., and I have every confidence that this legislation can get to the President’s desk this Congress,” Carper said in a statement. 

The bill passed the House last month and it has picked up more support in the Senate since its reintroduction.

In addition to Shaheen, Sens. Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanPast criticism of Trump becomes potent weapon in GOP primaries Cosmetic chemicals need a makeover Progressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema MORE (D-N.H.), Ben Ray LujanBen Ray LujanSenate Latino Democrats warn about low Hispanic vaccination rates DC statehood bill picks up Senate holdout Senate Democrats push Biden over raising refugee cap MORE (D-N.M.), Raphael WarnockRaphael WarnockPast criticism of Trump becomes potent weapon in GOP primaries Why the Democrats need Joe Manchin Bipartisan senators introduce bill to protect small businesses from cyberattacks MORE (D-Ga.), Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterHow Biden can get the infrastructure bill through Congress Pelosi: 'No intention' of abandoning Democrats' infrastructure goals McConnell seeks to divide and conquer Democrats MORE (D-Mont.), Jon OssoffJon OssoffStacey Abrams calls on young voters of color to support election reform bill MLB calls lawsuit over All-Star Game 'political theatrics' Georgia agriculture commissioner launches Senate campaign against Warnock MORE (D-Ga.) and John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperSenator's on-air interview features carpooling colleague waving from back seat DC statehood bill picks up Senate holdout Lobbying world MORE (D-Colo.) have also signed on this year. 

But the bill faces a less certain path to passage in the Senate, despite Democratic control of the chamber.

To pass under the current rules, Democrats would need the support of all 50 of their members and 10 Republicans.

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But the bill doesn’t have any GOP co-sponsors and doesn’t unify Democrats. 

Sens. Kyrsten SinemaKyrsten SinemaSenate to hold hearing on DC statehood bill Progressives threaten to block bipartisan infrastructure proposal Hundreds in West Virginia protest Manchin's opposition to voting rights legislation MORE (D-Ariz.), Mark KellyMark KellyPast criticism of Trump becomes potent weapon in GOP primaries Arizona AG Mark Brnovich launches Senate challenge to Mark Kelly Arizona Democrats launch voter outreach effort ahead of key Senate race MORE (D-Ariz.), Joe ManchinJoe ManchinProgressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC US, EU pledge to work together on climate amid reported dissension on coal Senate to hold hearing on DC statehood bill MORE (D-W.Va.) and Angus KingAngus KingHillicon Valley: Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC | Lawmakers urge Biden to be tough on cyber during summit with Putin | TSA working on additional security regulations following Colonial Pipeline hack Senate Armed Services member: Administration should have 'hair on fire' over Afghan interpreters Senators introducing B bill to help narrow digital divide MORE (I-Maine), who caucuses with Democrats, have not signed on as co-sponsors. 

And Manchin said late last month that he’s opposed to the bill and that "if Congress wants to make D.C. a state, it should propose a constitutional amendment ... and let the people of America vote."

"I would tell all my friends ... if you go down that path because you want to be politically popular ... you know it's going to go to the Supreme Court," Manchin said. "So why not do it the right way?"

--Updated at 1 p.m.