Romney: Republicans who block Jan. 6 commission will be against 'truth'

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGraham's COVID-19 'breakthrough' case jolts Senate The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate finalizes .2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill Senators introduce bipartisan infrastructure bill in rare Sunday session MORE (R-Utah) on Wednesday argued that Republican lawmakers who vote against a bill to establish a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol attack could be seen as “not wanting to let the truth come out.” 

Romney, one of just two GOP senators who have came out in support of the House-passed bill expected to be brought before the Senate this week, told CNN that Republicans’ vote on the measure could have profound effects for how voters look at the party. 

"I think the perception is on the part of the public that the January 6 Commission just trying to get to the truth of what happened, and that Republicans would be seen as not wanting to let the truth come out," the senator said. 

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"I don't believe that's what's the motivation but I think that's the perception,” added Romney, who earlier this year was one of seven GOP senators to vote to convict former President TrumpDonald TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - White House, Dems play blame game over evictions The Memo: Left pins hopes on Nina Turner in Ohio after recent defeats Biden administration to keep Trump-era rule of turning away migrants during pandemic MORE for inciting the Jan. 6 mob.

Romney and Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiGraham's COVID-19 'breakthrough' case jolts Senate Sarah Palin says she's praying about running for Senate against Murkowski Graham says he has COVID-19 'breakthrough' infection MORE (R-Alaska), who also voted to convict Trump, support the House bill, but it is expected to fall short of the 10 Republican senators needed to overcome a filibuster. 

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGraham's COVID-19 'breakthrough' case jolts Senate The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate finalizes .2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill Schumer: Democrats 'on track' to pass bipartisan deal, .5T budget MORE (R-Maine) said she would vote in favor of opening debate on the bill so she can propose an amendment making changes to the legislation, an aide confirmed to The Hill Wednesday. 

Collins had told reporters earlier Wednesday, “I want to see a commission. ... There are a lot of unanswered questions, and I'm working very hard to secure Republican votes for a commission.” 

The Maine senator specifically plans on addressing GOP concerns on provisions of the bill that would allow Democrats to hire all commission staff and that would stretch the commission into 2022. 

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The majority of the Senate GOP has opposed the commission, arguing that it would be a deeply partisan and unnecessary probe and that standing committees can look at Jan. 6. 

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - White House, Dems play blame game over evictions GOP skepticism looms over bipartisan spending deal On The Money: Biden, Pelosi struggle with end of eviction ban | Trump attorney says he will fight release of tax returns MORE (R-Ky.) accused the House proposal of being “slanted and unbalanced.”

Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerPoll: Majority of voters say more police are needed amid rise in crime America's middle class is getting hooked on government cash — and Democrats aren't done yet The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate finalizes .2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill MORE (D-N.Y.), who is expected to bring the legislation for debate in the Senate as early as Thursday, slammed Republicans, arguing they've changed their stories for why they oppose the bill.

“What’s really going on here? Why the various shifting reasons? ... It seems the real reason has nothing to do with the structure of the commission, nothing to do with the details of the bill. It all has to do with politics,” he argued.