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35 percent say passing infrastructure bill should be top congressional priority: poll

35 percent say passing infrastructure bill should be top congressional priority: poll
© Greg Nash

Roughly 35 percent of Americans in a new Politico-Morning Consult poll, say they believe passing an infrastructure bill should be a top priority for members of Congress, lower than several other issues.

The study was conducted between Friday and Monday, shortly before President BidenJoe BidenBaltimore police chief calls for more 'boots on the ground' to handle crime wave Biden to deliver remarks at Sen. John Warner's funeral Garland dismisses broad review of politicization of DOJ under Trump MORE ended negotiations with a key GOP senator as both sides failed to reach a deal. Biden has shifted talks to a bipartisan group of senators.

According to the poll, while over a third said infrastructure should be Congress's top priority, another 31 percent said an infrastructure bill was “an important, but lower priority,” and 14 percent said it was “not too important.”

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Democratic voters were more likely to list an infrastructure bill as a high priority, with roughly 49 percent of Democrats polled labeling it as being of top importance compared to 23 percent of GOP voters who said the same.

Several other issues rated as higher priorities for voters than infrastructure: 42 percent identified the federal budget deficit as the top priority, 41 percent said it was health care reform and 37 percent listed immigration.

Still, the highest priority issue among voters was stimulating economic growth to recover from the coronavirus pandemic, with 55 percent putting it in the top spot.

The survey of nearly 2,000 registered voters has an overall margin of error of 2 percentage points.

The poll comes a day after Biden cut off ongoing infrastructure talks with a GOP group led by Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoOvernight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 COVID-19 long-haulers press Congress for paid family leave Senate confirms Radhika Fox to lead EPA's water office MORE (R-W.Va.) after the two remained far from a deal despite weeks of negotiations. 

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Now, the White House is looking to reach an agreement with a bipartisan group that includes Sens. Kyrsten SinemaKyrsten SinemaSchumer vows next steps after 'ridiculous,' 'awful' GOP election bill filibuster White House draws ire of progressives amid voting rights defeat Senate GOP blocks voting rights bill MORE (D-Ariz.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanWhite House advisers huddle with Senate moderates on infrastructure The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden support, gas tax questions remain on infrastructure This week: Senate set for voting rights fight MORE (R-Ohio), Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterWhite House advisers huddle with Senate moderates on infrastructure Biden risks break with progressives on infrastructure Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE (D-Mont.), Bill CassidyBill CassidyPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle MORE (R-La.), Joe ManchinJoe ManchinSchumer vows next steps after 'ridiculous,' 'awful' GOP election bill filibuster Biden says push to advance elections overhaul 'far from over' Pelosi quashes reports on Jan. 6 select committee MORE (D-W.Va.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSchumer vows next steps after 'ridiculous,' 'awful' GOP election bill filibuster Murkowski to vote 'no' on voting rights bill White House advisers huddle with Senate moderates on infrastructure MORE (R-Alaska).

The senators have said that they aim to reach a proposal by the end of the week. 

Tester on Wednesday said tax increases were being taken off the table in the infrastructure negotiations, and Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyOvernight Defense: Joint Chiefs warn against sweeping reform to military justice system | Senate panel plans July briefing on war authorization repeal | National Guard may have 'training issues' if not reimbursed Equilibrium — Presented by NextEra Energy — Flaming shipwreck wreaks havoc on annual sea turtle migration Senate panel plans July briefing on war authorization repeal MORE (R-Utah), another member of the bipartisan group, told reporters that Republicans won’t agree to tax hikes as part of a proposal. 

Biden’s initial infrastructure plan totaled more than $2.2 trillion, though the bipartisan group, which has not yet released an official number, is said to be looking at a proposal of $900 billion. 

Meanwhile, more progressive lawmakers would like to see Democrats move forward a reconciliation bill that wouldn’t need Republican votes to pass, with Congressional Progressive Caucus Chairwoman Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalGarland dismisses broad review of politicization of DOJ under Trump The antitrust package is a Trojan horse conservatives must reject Progressives slam Garland for DOJ stances on Trump-era cases MORE (D-Wash.) arguing Wednesday that “Republicans are not going to do what needs to be done for working families.”