Bipartisan infrastructure group grows to 21 senators

A group of 11 more senators announced support Wednesday for a $974 billion, five-year bipartisan infrastructure framework unveiled last week, giving the proposal a crucial political boost in the nick of time.

Republican Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrSeven-figure ad campaign urges GOP to support infrastructure bill Senate starts infrastructure debate amid 11th-hour drama The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - A huge win for Biden, centrist senators MORE (N.C.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by AT&T - Simone wins bronze with altered beam routine The job of shielding journalists is not finished The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - White House, Dems play blame game over evictions MORE (S.C.), Mike RoundsMike RoundsSeven-figure ad campaign urges GOP to support infrastructure bill Graham's COVID-19 'breakthrough' case jolts Senate White House cyber chief backs new federal bureau to track threats MORE (S.D.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisSeven-figure ad campaign urges GOP to support infrastructure bill Graham's COVID-19 'breakthrough' case jolts Senate Biden's bipartisan deal faces Senate gauntlet MORE (N.C.) and Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungOvernight Defense: Police officer killed in violence outside Pentagon | Biden officials back repeal of Iraq War authorization | NSC pushed to oversee 'Havana Syndrome' response Biden officials back repealing Iraq War authorization Seven-figure ad campaign urges GOP to support infrastructure bill MORE (Ind.) announced Wednesday afternoon they will join the five Republicans who signed onto the framework last week.

Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranSeven-figure ad campaign urges GOP to support infrastructure bill GOP skepticism looms over bipartisan spending deal Graham: Bipartisan infrastructure pay-fors are insufficient MORE (R-Kan.) announced later Wednesday that he too would support the proposal.

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They were joined by four Democrats — Sens. Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - White House, Dems play blame game over evictions Graham's COVID-19 'breakthrough' case jolts Senate Lack of transatlantic cooperation on trade threatens global climate change goals MORE (Del.), Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanBiden names new watchdog at finance agency after embattled IG departs The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Officers recount the horror of Jan. 6 Trump says he'd like to see Chris Sununu challenge Hassan MORE (N.H.), John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperManchin grills Haaland over Biden oil and gas moratorium It's time for US to get serious about cleaning up space junk Bipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor MORE (Colo.) and Mark KellyMark KellyThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - White House, Dems play blame game over evictions Graham's COVID-19 'breakthrough' case jolts Senate Graham says he has COVID-19 'breakthrough' infection MORE (Ariz.). — and Sen. Angus KingAngus KingGOP skepticism looms over bipartisan spending deal White House cyber chief backs new federal bureau to track threats Manchin 'can't imagine' supporting change to filibuster for voting rights MORE (Maine), an independent who caucuses with the Democrats.

“We support this bipartisan framework that provides an historic investment in our nation’s core infrastructure needs without raising taxes,” the group of 20 senators said in a joint statement.

“We look forward to working with our Republican and Democratic colleagues to develop legislation based on this framework to address America’s critical infrastructure challenges.”

News of the additional Republican support now means a bipartisan infrastructure bill has a good chance of picking up 11 GOP votes and overcoming a filibuster.

But there’s still the problem of a half-dozen progressives who are threatening to vote against any bipartisan proposal that doesn’t include more ambitious plans to fight climate change, expand child care and long-term home health care and lower the cost of prescription drugs.

--Updated on June 17 at 10:46 a.m.