Manchin says he can't support Biden's $3.5 trillion spending plan

Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinBiden faces new pressure from climate groups after Powell pick Five ways Senate could change Biden's spending plan With extreme gerrymanders locking in, Biden needs to make democracy preservation job one MORE (W.Va.), a key moderate Democrat, said on Sunday that he can't support President BidenJoe BidenGOP eyes booting Democrats from seats if House flips Five House members meet with Taiwanese president despite Chinese objections Sunday shows preview: New COVID-19 variant emerges; supply chain issues and inflation persist MORE’s $3.5 trillion spending plan. 

"We don't have the need to rush into this and get it done within one week because there's some deadline we're meeting or someone's going to fall through the cracks," Manchin said on NBC's "Meet the Press." 

"I want to make sure that children are getting taken care of, that people are basically having an opportunity to go back to work. We have 11 million jobs that we haven't filled, 8 million people still unemployed. Something's not matching up there," he added.

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Manchin also said he would look at adjusting the tax code first if he were writing the bill from scratch. 

On CNN's "State of the Union," Manchin told host Dana BashDana BashDemocrats optimistic as social spending bill heads to Senate O'Rourke won't say if he wants Biden to campaign for him in Texas senate race Fauci says fully vaccinated families can 'absolutely' enjoy holidays inside without masks MORE that he didn't support the timeline of voting on the measure this week so that the House could pass it by Sept. 27.

"There's no way we can get this done by the 27th if we do our job," he said.

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Manchin added that Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerSchumer mourns death of 'amazing' father Feehery: The honest contrarian Biden administration to release oil from strategic reserve: reports MORE (D-N.Y.) "will not have my vote, and Chuck knows that."

Manchin earlier this month advised Democrats to "hit the pause button" on Biden's plan. 

"Let’s sit back. Let’s see what happens," he said at an event in West Virginia. "We have so much on our plate. We really have an awful lot. I think that would be the prudent, wise thing to do."

Updated at 10:40 a.m.