Senate

Cassidy says he won't vote for Trump if he runs in 2024

Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) said he will not vote for former President Trump if he wages a bid for the presidency in 2024.

Cassidy, during an interview with "Axios on HBO" that aired on Sunday, also doubled down on his prediction that Trump will not be the GOP nominee if he decides to run again in the next cycle.

The Republican senator told Axios's Mike Allen "I don't know that" when discussing the likelihood that Trump will win the GOP nomination in 2024 if he launches a third campaign for the White House.

"President Trump is the first president, in the Republican side at least, to lose the House, the Senate and the presidency in four years. Elections are about winning," Cassidy said.

When pressed on whether Trump could lose the nomination in 2024, Cassidy said "if you want to win the presidency, and hopefully that's what voters are thinking about, I think he might."

"But it's clear you ain't voting for him," Allen said to Cassidy.

"I'm not," the Republican senator responded.

Cassidy sounded a similar note in February of this year during an interview on CNN's "State of the Union" when discussing a future Trump campaign.

Asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he would support a 2024 Trump ticket if he were to win the nomination, Cassidy said he was not sure the former president would make it that far.

"That's a theoretical that I don't think will come to pass," Cassidy said, adding "I don't mean to duck, but the truth is you could ask me [about] a lot of people, if they are fit. Point is, I don't think he'll be our nominee."

Cassidy is one of the seven Republican senators who voted to convict Trump for incitement of an insurrection during his second impeachment trial in February of this year. The former president, however, was ultimately acquitted in a 57-43 vote.

Trump has not announced any plans to run for president again in 2024, but his latest actions and comments are pointing toward a future bid.

The former president made a stop last weekend in Iowa, the first-in-the-nation caucus state. Additionally, a report surfaced from The Washington Post earlier this month that said advisers told Trump to hold off on announcing his 2024 campaign out of concern for next year's midterm races.

Trump has also sent out a number of midterm endorsements in recent weeks, hired aides in key states and has argued in media interviews that he would easily clinch the GOP nomination should he run. 

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