GOP candidates outraising Dems

GOP candidates outraising Dems

Republican Senate candidates outraised their Democratic rivals in the first quarter.

Much of that money went to non-incumbents.

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Republicans had five of the top six fundraisers among Senate candidates and only one of them was an incumbent — Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Redistricting reform key to achieving the bipartisanship Americans claim to want Kelly takes under-the-radar approach in Arizona Senate race MORE (R-Ariz.).

The top 10 GOP Senate candidates outraised the top 10 Democratic candidates $20 million to $16 million, even though Democrats had six incumbents on that list and Republicans had two.

Several of the most successful GOP fundraisers have clear paths to the November election.

 Rep. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkBiden's relationship with 'Joe-Joe' Manchin hits the rocks Let's fix America's accounting problem — starting with Build Back Better Duckworth announces reelection bid MORE (R-Ill.) and former Reps. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanWicker: Biden comments on Ukraine caused 'distress' for both parties These Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Biden calls Intel's B investment to build chip factories a tool for economic recovery MORE (R-Ohio) and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) headlined a big day for the GOP in three of the top Senate races on the map.

All raised more than $2 million. Kirk and Toomey raised about twice as much as the Democrats they face and Portman raised four times more than his main Democratic competition: Lt. Gov. Lee Fisher (D).

But other Republicans aren’t so lucky. They raised the money, but they have to get through a competitive primary first.

In Florida, former state House Speaker Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioPut partisan politics aside — The Child Tax Credit must be renewed immediately These Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Lawmakers press Biden admin to send more military aid to Ukraine MORE (R) turned in the biggest quarter of all — $3.6 million — but he faces a primary with Gov. Charlie Crist, who raised $1.1 million.

In California, the three Republican candidates turned in their best quarters to date — a combined total of $4 million. But former Rep. Tom Campbell, businesswoman Carly Fiorina and state Assemblyman Chuck DeVore have to get past the June 8 primary. Meanwhile, Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerBass raises nearly million since launching LA mayor campaign Harry Reid, political pugilist and longtime Senate majority leader, dies Congress can prevent another Jan. 6 by updating a key elections law MORE (D-Calif.) raised a party best of $2.4 million and has a clear field to November.

Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson set a new personal best with $733,000 raised, but that only brought him to equal financial footing with GOP front-runner Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 I'm furious about Democrats taking the blame — it's time to fight back Rand Paul cancels DirecTV subscription after it drops OAN MORE. Both of them outraised Lt. Gov. Dan Mongiardo, who is running against state Attorney General Jack Conway in the Democratic primary and raised only $312,000 in the first quarter. Conway’s numbers weren’t available as of press time.

In New Hampshire, former state Attorney General Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Biden's FDA nominee advances through key Senate committee The 10 races that will decide the Senate majority MORE (R), the party favorite, raised $671,000. But she also saw businessman Bill Binnie up his self-funding to about $3 million in the GOP primary. Rep. Paul Hodes (D-N.H.) raised $665,000 and has a clear primary.

Another self-funding Republican in Connecticut, former WWE CEO Linda McMahon, plugged an additional $8 million of her own money into the race, bringing her total self-funding to $14 million, while former Rep. Rob Simmons (R-Conn.) saw his receipts drop to $550,000. The winner gets state Attorney General Richard Blumenthal, who raised $1.9 million in his first quarter as a candidate and is not expected to face a difficult primary.

McCain ramped up his fundraising big time after the entry of former Rep. J.D. Hayworth (R-Ariz.) into his primary, and was able to outraise the former congressman $2.2 million to $1 million.

In the race to face Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Connected Commerce Council - Biden faces reporters as his agenda teeters Biden hits one-year mark in dire straits 'All or nothing' won't bolster American democracy: Reform the filibuster and Electoral Count Act MORE (D-Nev.), former state GOP Chairwoman Sue Lowden raised $500,000 and self-funded the same amount, while businessman Danny Tarkanian (R) raised $445,000. Reid raised $1.8 million.

Also out west, former Colorado Lt. Gov. Jane Norton (R) raised $816,000 but spent nearly all of it on her primary with Weld County District Attorney Ken Buck, who raised $119,000 and self-funded $100,000.

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In Indiana, former Sen. Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsAn independent commission should review our National Defense Strategy Overnight Hillicon Valley — Scrutiny over Instagram's impact on teens Former national security officials warn antitrust bills could help China in tech race MORE (R-Ind.) turned in a disappointing report in his first quarter as a candidate for his old seat. He raised $354,000 and self-funded $25,000, while likely Democratic nominee Rep. Brad Ellsworth (D-Ind.) raised $625,000. Coats faces a primary May 4; Ellsworth does not. Coats’s GOP competition had not released fundraising numbers as of press time.

In the Kansas GOP primary, Rep. Todd Tiahrt (R-Kan.) outraised Rep. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Overnight Energy & Environment — Starting from 'scratch' on climate, spending bill Eight senators ask Biden to reverse course on Trump-era solar tariffs MORE (R-Kan.) for the first time, $375,000 to $346,000, in the race to replace Sen. Sam Brownback (R-Kan.), who is running for governor.

Sen. Bob Bennett (R-Utah) easily outraised the GOP field running against him. He pulled in $739,000, compared to $115,000 for attorney Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeePut partisan politics aside — The Child Tax Credit must be renewed immediately These Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Senate panel advances bill blocking tech giants from favoring own products MORE and $20,000 for former congressional candidate Tim Bridgewater. Bennett, however, still faces peril in the May 8 Utah GOP nominating convention.

While a lot of money is flooding into the GOP primaries, it’s going to the Democrats in Arkansas. There, Lt. Gov. Bill Halter (D) raised $2 million for his race against Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.), who raised $1.3 million. On the GOP side, Rep. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Postal Service expansion into banking services misguided Arkansas governor backs Sarah Huckabee Sanders to replace him MORE (R-Ark.) did not release his totals as of press time, while state Sen. Gilbert Baker raised $155,000.

In other races, Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) outraised Rep. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Swalwell slams House Republican for touting funding in bill she voted down Johnson, Thune signal GOP's rising confidence MORE (R-Mo.) $1.5 million to $1.3 million, Rep. Mike Castle (R-Del.) outraised New Castle County Executive Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsSunday shows preview: US reaffirms support for Ukraine amid threat of Russian invasion Coons opposes sending US troops to Ukraine: 'We would simply be sacrificing them' On The Money — Labor chief touts efforts to promote job growth MORE (D) $826,000 to $635,000, and Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Hillicon Valley — Senate panel advances major antitrust bill Senate panel advances bill blocking tech giants from favoring own products MORE (R-Iowa) and challenger Roxanne Conlin (D) both raised about $630,000, with Conlin self-funding another $250,000.

Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Pelosi says she's open to stock trading ban for Congress Momentum builds to prohibit lawmakers from trading stocks MORE (R-N.C.) and David VitterDavid Bruce VitterBiden inaugural committee to refund former senator's donation due to foreign agent status Bottom line Lysol, Charmin keep new consumer brand group lobbyist busy during pandemic MORE (R-La.) — the two most vulnerable GOP incumbents — raised $1.5 million and $1.1 million, respectively. Vitter raised nearly twice as much as Rep. Charlie Melancon (D-La.), while Burr’s Democratic opponents didn’t release their totals as of press time.