Texas Republicans slam White House over disaster relief request

Texas Republicans slam White House over disaster relief request
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A slew of Republican Texas officials ripped the White House's most recent disaster aid request on Friday, as the state works to recover from the devastating impacts of Hurricane Harvey. 

The White House is requesting roughly $44 billion in additional aid from Congress for Puerto Rico, Texas, Florida and other disaster-stricken areas, however, the amount is less than what officials from some of the affected areas were hoping to see.

"What was offered up by Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyOn The Money: Judge rules banks can give Trump records to House | Mnuchin pegs debt ceiling deadline as 'late summer' | Democrats see momentum in Trump tax return fight | House rebukes Trump changes to consumer agency House rebukes Mulvaney's efforts to rein in consumer bureau The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi remains firm despite new impeachment push MORE and [his Office of Management and Budget (OMB)] is completely inadequate for the needs of the state of Texas and I believe does not live up to what the president wants to achieve," Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) said at a news conference on Friday. 

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"The president has told me privately what he's said publicly, and that is that he wants to be the builder president," he continued. "The president has said that he wants this to be the best recovery from a disaster ever."

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Bipartisan House bill calls for strategy to protect 5G networks from foreign threats Collins offering bill to boost battery research as GOP pushes energy 'innovation' MORE (R-Texas) said he was "not satisfied" with the request, dubbing it "wholly inadequate," while Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzThe Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan Senate GOP votes to permanently ban earmarks Jim Carrey fires back at 'Joe McCarthy wanna-be' Cruz MORE (R-Texas) said he would review the request and push to "ensure our great state has the resources it needs to rebuild and come back stronger than ever." 

Rep. John CulbersonJohn Abney CulbersonK Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers Ex-GOP Rep. Denham heads to lobbying firm 20 years after Columbine, Dems bullish on gun reform MORE (R-Texas), whose district encompasses a large potion of Houston, which suffered from catastrophic flooding after the storm, said the request shows a "complete lack of understanding of the fundamental needs of Texans."

"Thankfully, Congress funds the government — not OMB. I will work tirelessly with my colleagues to fix this," Culberson said.

Rep. Michael McCaulMichael Thomas McCaulTillerson meets with House Foreign Affairs Committee Overnight Defense: Congressional leaders receive classified briefing on Iran | Trump on war: 'I hope not' | Key Republican calls threats credible | Warren plan targets corporate influence at Pentagon Bipartisan lawmakers urge Trump to reconsider Central America aid cuts MORE (R-Texas) voiced his displeasure with the request, calling it “insufficient and unacceptable" in a statement.

“We stand together opposed to this level of funding and will continue to fight to help Texas rebuild,” a group of Houston-area Republicans said in a statement.

Texas officials are not the only group upset about the request. Rep. Dennis RossDennis Alan RossEx-GOP lawmaker joins family firm  Ex-GOP lawmaker joins Florida lobbying firm Incoming GOP lawmaker says he may have violated campaign finance law MORE (R-Fla.) said he would not support the request because it lacked relief for citrus growers affected by Hurricane Irma in Florida.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerNo agreement on budget caps in sight ahead of Memorial Day recess Ex-White House photographer roasts Trump: 'This is what a cover up looked like' under Obama Pelosi: Trump 'is engaged in a cover-up' MORE (D-N.Y.) also blasted the request on Twitter. 

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders defended the request on Friday and called for Texas to contribute more money in the process. 

“Up until this point, Texas has not put any state dollars into this process,” Sanders said.

“We feel strongly that they should step up and play a role and work with the federal government in this process. We did a thorough assessment and that was completed and this was the number that we put forward to Congress today.”

Harvey brought heavy winds and catastrophic flooding to large swaths of southeastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana in August, while Florida was pummeled by Hurricane Irma in September. 

Virtually the entire island of Puerto Rico was also left without power in September after Hurricane Maria hit the U.S. territory.