Record numbers of women nominated for governor, Congress

Record numbers of women nominated for governor, Congress
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A record number of women have won major party nominations for governorships and seats in the House of Representatives this year — a full month before primary season is officially over.

Democrats on Tuesday chose former Michigan House Minority Leader Gretchen Whitmer (D) and Kansas state Sen. Laura Kelly (D) as their nominees for governorships.

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That brings the number of women who have won major party gubernatorial nominations to 11 — one more than the previous record, set five times over the last quarter century.

Democrats have nominated women as their gubernatorial candidates in Idaho, Texas, Georgia, New Mexico and Maine. Republicans nominated Rep. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemGOP struggles to win votes for Trump’s B wall demand Governors helping governors South Dakota New Members 2019 MORE (R) in South Dakota. Incumbent Govs. Kate Brown (D) of Oregon, Kay Ivey (R) of Alabama and Kim Reynolds (R) of Iowa have all won renomination.

The number of female gubernatorial candidates is almost certain to swell in the month before primaries end. Women are close to the lead or leading races in Hawaii, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Florida and New Hampshire. Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo (D) is all but certain to win renomination.

"We're not just breaking records here this year, we're blowing through them," said Debbie Walsh, director of the Center for American Women and Politics at the Eagleton Institute at Rutgers. "What we're seeing this year is the whole reason why we want more women to run for office."

Data from the Center for American Women and Politics show more women have won nominations for seats in Congress, as well.

When the polls closed in Michigan, Missouri and Washington state on Tuesday, a handful of women formally advanced to the November midterm elections, bringing the total number of female nominees above the previous record. Two years ago, 167 women secured major party nominations for seats in Congress.

Many candidates who won nominations on Tuesday are almost certain to return to Congress, including incumbents in safe districts like Reps. Debbie DingellDeborah (Debbie) Ann DingellGM chief meets lawmakers to calm anger over cuts GM lobbyists go into full crisis mode over layoffs GM draws Washington’s anger with new layoffs MORE (D-Mich.), Brenda LawrenceBrenda Lulenar LawrenceFemale House Dems urge Senate to delay Kavanaugh testimony for FBI investigation House Dems push to delay Kavanaugh vote for investigation Lawmakers move to award posthumous Congressional Gold Medal to Aretha Franklin MORE (D-Mich.), Ann WagnerAnn Louise WagnerGOP congresswoman says she opted out of NRCC run because McCarthy had 'a different plan' GOP women face steeper climb in Trump era Midterm results shake up national map MORE (R-Mo.) and Vicky HartzlerVicky Jo HartzlerFarm bill presents opportunity to improve SNAP program Record numbers of women nominated for governor, Congress Five GOP lawmakers mulling bid to lead conservative caucus MORE (R-Mo.).

Four women who hold House seats from Washington state — Reps. Suzan DelBeneSuzan Kay DelBeneBustos elected to lead Democratic campaign arm Maloney drops out of Democratic campaign committee race Maloney asks for delay in DCCC vote due to hospitalization MORE (D), Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalThe Hill's Morning Report — Will Trump strike a deal with Chuck and Nancy? Push to pay congressional interns an hour gains traction with progressives Dem lawmaker says she helped group of migrants enter U.S., apply for asylum MORE (D), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by Amgen — House passes bill to stop drug companies overcharging Medicaid | Incoming Dem chairman open to 'Medicare For All' hearings | Bill to reduce maternal mortality rates passes House House passes bipartisan bill aimed at reversing rising maternal mortality rates Planned Parenthood president 'deeply concerned' about Kavanaugh presence on Supreme Court MORE (R) and Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersWashington governor announces killer whale recovery plan ‘Wake up, dudes’ — gender gap confounds GOP women The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by T-Mobile — House, Senate leaders named as Pelosi lobbies for support to be Speaker MORE (R) — advanced to November's midterm elections.

McMorris Rodgers faces a potentially strong challenge from Lisa Brown, a former state Senate Democratic leader. With thousands of ballots left to count, McMorris Rodgers had taken only about 500 votes more than Brown in the top-two primary, hinting at a close race ahead.

Herrera Beutler will also face a Democratic woman in November. The Republican narrowly led college professor Carolyn Long (D), 41 to 37 percent, with five other candidates splitting the remaining vote.

Democratic women won primaries on Tuesday and will face Reps. Tim WalbergTimothy (Tim) Lee WalbergMidterm results shake up national map Dems seek to rebuild blue wall in Rust Belt contests Record numbers of women nominated for governor, Congress MORE (R-Mich.), Mike Bishop (R-Mich.), Justin AmashJustin AmashThe real winner of the 2018 midterms: individual liberty Scarborough rips Graham for saying he’ll introduce legislation to end birthright citizenship: He’s ‘degrading’ himself for Trump GOP lawmaker: Trump 'cannot amend Constitution or laws via executive order' MORE (R-Mich.), Paul MitchellPaul MitchellLet capitalism — not government — build needed infrastructure Members mark 'Repeal Day' with National Beer Wholesalers Association Michigan lawmaker calls GM cuts ‘unacceptable’ MORE (R-Mich.), Blaine LuetkemeyerWayne (Blaine) Blaine LuetkemeyerRepublican McHenry announces bid for Financial Services ranking member On The Money: Midterms to shake up House finance panel | Chamber chief says US not in trade war | Mulvaney moving CFPB unit out of DC | Conservatives frustrated over big spending bills Midterms to shake up top posts on House finance panel MORE (R-Mo.), Jason SmithJason Thomas SmithMcCarthy defeats Jordan for minority leader in 159-to-43 vote House Republicans set to elect similar team of leaders despite midterm thumping Record numbers of women nominated for governor, Congress MORE (R-Mo.) and Dan NewhouseDaniel (Dan) Milton NewhouseWashington governor announces killer whale recovery plan GOP struggles to find right Republican for Rules The Hill’s 12:30 Report — Presented by The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates — Trump says Cohen should go to jail | Nation prepares for Bush 41 funeral | Congress delays votes MORE (R-Wash.) in the fall. Democrats also nominated a woman, Haley Stevens, to run for a seat being vacated by Rep. Dave TrottDavid Alan TrottMeet the lawmakers putting politics aside to save our climate Michigan New Members 2019 Democrats flip Michigan seat in race between two political newcomers MORE (R-Mich.).

And Democrats nominated women to replace former Rep. John ConyersJohn James ConyersBrenda Jones sworn into House for final weeks of 2018 GOP approves rule for Don Young Michigan New Members 2019 MORE Jr. (D-Mich.), who resigned in disgrace over sexual harassment accusations. Detroit voters picked City Council President Brenda Jones as the Democratic nominee to fill the remainder of Conyers's term and former state Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D) to take over when the next Congress convenes.

Republicans picked insurance consultant Candius Stearns (R) as their nominee to replace retiring Rep. Sandy Levin (D-Mich.). Stearns will face Andy Levin, Sandy's son, in the heavily Democratic district in November.

Women are running for office, and winning, more frequently now than ever before, Walsh said. The first year in which women captured more than 100 party nominations for U.S. House seats was 1992; every year since, women have won more than 100 nominations.

"If women aren't in these races, we're not going to see more women getting elected. It's a process," Walsh said.

The number of women nominated by major parties for House seats will expand in the month until primary season is over. Hawaii, Connecticut, Minnesota, Vermont, Wisconsin, Alaska, Wyoming, Arizona, Florida, Massachusetts, Delaware, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Louisiana all have primary elections ahead.