School superintendent charged with fraud for allegedly using her insurance to help sick student

School superintendent charged with fraud for allegedly using her insurance to help sick student
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A school superintendent in Indiana is facing charges of insurance fraud after she allegedly used her own coverage to help a sick student get medical care. 

Casey Smitherman admitted to bringing the student to an emergency clinic for examination and signing him in under her son’s name, according to court documents obtained by Fox59 News in Indianapolis. She reportedly said the boy was initially turned away at another clinic, prompting her to say he was her son at the second facility.

The total insurance claim for the medical visit was $233, the TV station reported.

According to the documents, she also said she filled a prescription for the 15-year-old student using her son’s name. 

“After one clinic refused to give the boy necessary treatment, I took him to a different clinic and told them he was my son. I knew he did not have insurance, and I wanted to do all I could to help him get well,” she said, according to the court documents. “I know this action was wrong. In the moment, my only concern was for this child’s health.”

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Smitherman has been charged with official misconduct, insurance fraud, insurance application fraud and identity deception, according to Fox59. Prosecutors have reportedly agreed to let her enter a diversion program and avoid a criminal conviction.

She told police that she checked on the student at home when he did not come to school, according to the TV station, which added that she said that she has helped him in the past by bringing him clothes and helping clean his house. She has not called child services out of fear that the student would be placed in foster care, the station added.

The district’s school board president, Brent Kane, issued a statement in support of Smitherman, saying she has “tirelessly worked for the best interests of all students.”

“She made an unfortunate mistake, but we understand that it was out of concern for this child’s welfare,” Kane said. “We know she understands what she did was wrong, but she continues to have our support.”