Colorado governor expected to sign 'red flag' gun bill

The Colorado House on Monday gave final approval to a bill that would allow law enforcement to seize firearms from people who are viewed as threats. 

The Denver Post reported that Colorado's lower chamber passed a new version of the measure, known as the "red flag" bill, just days after it was amended by the Senate. The bill will now head to Gov. Jared PolisJared Schutz PolisProtesters at Colorado State Capitol call for Columbus Day to be abolished Freedom of the press under fire in Colorado Democrats grill BLM chief over plans to move officials out of DC MORE's (D) desk.

Polis has pledged to sign the bill, according to Denver's CBS affiliate

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State Rep. Tom Sullivan (D), a sponsor of the bill whose son died in a mass shooting in the state, praised the measure's passage. 

“Today, the House and the legislature stood up and did the right thing,” Sullivan said, according to the Post. “One of the reasons I ran for office was so I could tell all of you about my son Alex, who lit up rooms and was beloved, and so I could tell all of you about other victims and families of gun violence.

"This bill will give law enforcement and families the tools that they need to stop tragedies from constantly happening and save lives.”

The Denver Post noted that about a dozen states, including Washington, D.C., have laws similar to the one proposed in Colorado. 

But while the measure has been a priority among state Democratic lawmakers, conservative law enforcement officers have voiced objections. 

The Post noted that conservative sheriffs and county commissioners have pledged to support officers who decline to carry out orders to take away weapons from people deemed as a potential danger to themselves or others.

Weld County Sheriff Steve Reams previously told CNN that he'd rather go to jail than enforce the extreme protection orders.

"It's a matter of doing what's right," he said. 
 
Reams has also said that he'd be willing to work with judges regarding potential issues with the law, The Post noted. 

House Majority Leader Alec Garnett (D) called on sheriffs critical of the measure to join a committee that will help craft protocols regarding the law.