Texas House Speaker drops constitutional carry bill after gun rights activist shows up at his home

Texas's Republican House Speaker on Friday moved to drop the state's "constitutional carry" legislation after a gun rights activist showed up at his home to push for the bill.

Dennis Bonnen said the bill was "dead" after Chris McNutt, the executive director of Texas Gun Rights, appeared at his home to advocate for the controversial legislation that would allow Texans to carry firearms without a license, The Dallas Morning News reported

ADVERTISEMENT

McNutt, according to the outlet, drove 50 miles south of Houston last Wednesday before turning up at Bonnen's house to question why the legislation wasn't moving forward faster. The paper reported that McNutt had posted rants on Facebook about the lack of movement on the bill prior to driving to Bonnen's house.

Bonnen said McNutt's decision to show up at his house unannounced was a demonstration of “insanity” and called him an "overzealous advocate for criminals to get a gun."

McNutt also reportedly visited the homes of GOP state representatives Dustin Burrows and Four Price. Bonnen said his home has since been put on surveillance by the Department of Public Safety for his protection.

"If you want to talk about issues and you want to advocate, you do it in this building. You don’t do it at our residences," Bonnen said, according to the local news outlet. "Threats and intimidation will never advance your issue. Their issue is dead."

McNutt called Bonnen’s decision to nix the legislation a "deliberate overreaction."

"If politicians like Speaker Dennis Bonnen think they can show up at the doorsteps of Second Amendment supporters and make promises to earn votes in the election season, they shouldn't be surprised when we show up in their neighborhoods to insist they simply keep their promises in the legislative session," McNutt told The Dallas Morning News.

The bill, sponsored by state Rep. Jonathan Stickland (R), had remained pending in the House Homeland Security and Public Safety Committee for four months into the legislative session, according to the paper.