Michigan AG says she wouldn't enforce an abortion ban even if Roe were overturned

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel (D) on Tuesday vowed never to prosecute someone for obtaining or providing an abortion, even if Roe v. Wade is overturned.

Nessel made the pledge at a Planned Parenthood Advocates of Michigan summit after arguing that the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision would likely be overturned now that Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump tells House investigators 'no' Kudlow downplays Moore's past comments on women: He's 'a wiseass kind of guy' On The Money: Fed pick Moore says he will drop out if he becomes a 'political problem' | Trump vows to fight 'all the subpoenas' | Deutsche Bank reportedly turning Trump records over to NY officials | Average tax refund down 2 percent MORE is on the bench, according to MLive.com.

“I will never prosecute a woman, or her doctor, for making the difficult decision to terminate a pregnancy," Nessel said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Michigan never formally repealed a 173-year-old law that bars women from having an abortion, according to MLive. If Roe v. Wade were to be overturned, receiving an abortion could become a felony in the state, except for when a woman's life is in danger.

 

“I think I can go four or maybe eight years without sending women to be butchered in back alleys," Nessel said, adding that citizens must elect candidates who support abortion rights.

“If we can not and will not commit to make reproductive freedoms a priority in 2020 then we most certainly will lose them for the remainder of all of our lives and for those of future generations as well,” she said.

Nessel's comments come as many GOP-led state legislatures move to enforce stricter regulations surrounding abortions. Ohio and Mississippi's Republican governors have signed laws that prevent women from receiving an abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, which doctors say can happen as early as five weeks into a pregnancy.
 
Fifty-seven percent of registered voters say Roe v. Wade should remain intact, according to a Fox News poll from February.