New Hampshire senator to ask 2020 Dems to back repeal of state residency law

New Hampshire senator to ask 2020 Dems to back repeal of state residency law
© Greg Nash

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenCrucial for Congress to fund life-saving diabetes research Overnight Defense: House approves 3 billion defense bill | Liberal sweeteners draw progressive votes | Bill includes measure blocking Trump from military action on Iran Senators urge Trump to sanction Turkey for accepting Russian missile shipment MORE (D-N.H.) will ask all 2020 Democratic candidates to oppose a state law that would require college students to be permanent Granite State residents to be allowed to vote, according to CNN.

"I am asking every candidate for President to stand up for these students, condemning these tactics and protecting the integrity of New Hampshire's voting process by signing a petition publicly denouncing this voter suppression law," reads the letter, set to be delivered to all 18 declared Democratic candidates on  Monday, according to CNN.

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Under current New Hampshire law, registered voters must only prove “domicile” rather than permanent residency, according to CNN. The more restrictive House Bill 1264, which takes effect in July, would require out-of-state residents such as college students to pay to obtain a state driver’s license as well as register their cars within 60 days of established residency.

The law, Shaheen wrote, imposes a “poll tax” on college students, who are being “disenfranchised by photo ID requirements, arbitrary challenges to residency, and unfounded allegations of fraud," according to CNN. In 2017, President TrumpDonald John TrumpEsper sidesteps question on whether he aligns more with Mattis or Trump Warren embraces Thiel label: 'Good' As tensions escalate, US must intensify pressure on Iran and the IAEA MORE reportedly claimed, without evidence, that illegal votes from Massachusetts residents cost him the state in the 2016 election and unseated former Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteKey endorsements: A who's who in early states Sinema, Gallagher fastest lawmakers in charity race New Hampshire senator to ask 2020 Dems to back repeal of state residency law MORE (R).

"With the nation's eyes turned toward our first-in-the-nation primary, we have an opportunity to send a clear message to anyone seeking to subvert voting rights," Shaheen wrote, according to CNN.

The early-primary state will be the site of five back-to-back candidate town halls on Monday: Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet Fundraising numbers highlight growing divide in 2020 race Critics slam billion Facebook fine as weak MORE (D-Minn.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersWarren embraces Thiel label: 'Good' Sanders slams decision not to charge officer who killed Eric Garner Cardi B says voters let Bernie Sanders down MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHarris slams DOJ decision not to charge police in Eric Garner's death Harris vows to 'put people over profit' in prescription drug plan The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet MORE (D-Calif.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren embraces Thiel label: 'Good' Trump says administration will 'take a look' after Thiel raises concerns about Google, China Thiel calls Warren the most 'dangerous' Democratic candidate MORE (D-Mass.) and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet Fundraising numbers highlight growing divide in 2020 race South Bend police officer resigns after killing of black man MORE.

Shaheen’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill.