New Hampshire senator to ask 2020 Dems to back repeal of state residency law

New Hampshire senator to ask 2020 Dems to back repeal of state residency law
© Greg Nash

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenOvernight Defense: Dems grill Trump Army, Air Force picks | House chair subpoenas Trump Afghanistan negotiator | Trump officials release military aid to Ukraine Defense spending bill advances over Democratic wall objections Democrats ramp up calls to investigate NOAA MORE (D-N.H.) will ask all 2020 Democratic candidates to oppose a state law that would require college students to be permanent Granite State residents to be allowed to vote, according to CNN.

"I am asking every candidate for President to stand up for these students, condemning these tactics and protecting the integrity of New Hampshire's voting process by signing a petition publicly denouncing this voter suppression law," reads the letter, set to be delivered to all 18 declared Democratic candidates on  Monday, according to CNN.

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Under current New Hampshire law, registered voters must only prove “domicile” rather than permanent residency, according to CNN. The more restrictive House Bill 1264, which takes effect in July, would require out-of-state residents such as college students to pay to obtain a state driver’s license as well as register their cars within 60 days of established residency.

The law, Shaheen wrote, imposes a “poll tax” on college students, who are being “disenfranchised by photo ID requirements, arbitrary challenges to residency, and unfounded allegations of fraud," according to CNN. In 2017, President TrumpDonald John TrumpHarris bashes Kavanaugh's 'sham' nomination process, calls for his impeachment after sexual misconduct allegation Celebrating 'Hispanic Heritage Month' in the Age of Trump Let's not play Charlie Brown to Iran's Lucy MORE reportedly claimed, without evidence, that illegal votes from Massachusetts residents cost him the state in the 2016 election and unseated former Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteGOP fears Trump backlash in suburbs Trump makes rare trip to Clinton state, hoping to win back New Hampshire Key endorsements: A who's who in early states MORE (R).

"With the nation's eyes turned toward our first-in-the-nation primary, we have an opportunity to send a clear message to anyone seeking to subvert voting rights," Shaheen wrote, according to CNN.

The early-primary state will be the site of five back-to-back candidate town halls on Monday: Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSunday shows - Guns dominate after Democratic debate Klobuchar: Investigation into Kavanaugh 'a sham' Sunday shows preview: Democratic candidates make the rounds after debate MORE (D-Minn.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersGun control: Campaigning vs. legislating Booker defends middle-ground health care approach: 'We're going to fight to get there' Sunday shows preview: Democratic candidates make the rounds after debate MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHarris bashes Kavanaugh's 'sham' nomination process, calls for his impeachment after sexual misconduct allegation Gun control: Campaigning vs. legislating Booker defends middle-ground health care approach: 'We're going to fight to get there' MORE (D-Calif.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenGun control: Campaigning vs. legislating Booker defends middle-ground health care approach: 'We're going to fight to get there' Democrats spar over electoral appeal of 'Medicare for All' MORE (D-Mass.) and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegO'Rourke responds to Buttigieg's gun criticism: 'That calculation and fear is what got us here in the first place' Buttigieg: Biden gave 'bad' debate answer on slavery's legacy O'Rourke's debate moment reignites gun debate on Sunday shows MORE.

Shaheen’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill.