New Hampshire senator to ask 2020 Dems to back repeal of state residency law

New Hampshire senator to ask 2020 Dems to back repeal of state residency law
© Greg Nash

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenForeign Relations senators demand Iran briefing The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - After GOP infighting, Trump Jr. agrees to testify again Bipartisan senators seek sanctions on Russian pipeline work MORE (D-N.H.) will ask all 2020 Democratic candidates to oppose a state law that would require college students to be permanent Granite State residents to be allowed to vote, according to CNN.

"I am asking every candidate for President to stand up for these students, condemning these tactics and protecting the integrity of New Hampshire's voting process by signing a petition publicly denouncing this voter suppression law," reads the letter, set to be delivered to all 18 declared Democratic candidates on  Monday, according to CNN.

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Under current New Hampshire law, registered voters must only prove “domicile” rather than permanent residency, according to CNN. The more restrictive House Bill 1264, which takes effect in July, would require out-of-state residents such as college students to pay to obtain a state driver’s license as well as register their cars within 60 days of established residency.

The law, Shaheen wrote, imposes a “poll tax” on college students, who are being “disenfranchised by photo ID requirements, arbitrary challenges to residency, and unfounded allegations of fraud," according to CNN. In 2017, President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls for Republicans to be 'united' on abortion Tlaib calls on Amash to join impeachment resolution Facebook temporarily suspended conservative commentator Candace Owens MORE reportedly claimed, without evidence, that illegal votes from Massachusetts residents cost him the state in the 2016 election and unseated former Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteSinema, Gallagher fastest lawmakers in charity race New Hampshire senator to ask 2020 Dems to back repeal of state residency law Schultz recruiting GOP insiders ahead of possible 2020 bid MORE (R).

"With the nation's eyes turned toward our first-in-the-nation primary, we have an opportunity to send a clear message to anyone seeking to subvert voting rights," Shaheen wrote, according to CNN.

The early-primary state will be the site of five back-to-back candidate town halls on Monday: Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharInslee gives public option first test in Washington state Momentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights Poll: Biden is only Dem candidate that beats Trump outside of margin of error MORE (D-Minn.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersHere are the potential candidates still eyeing 2020 bids Sanders unveils education plan that would ban for-profit charter schools Warren policy ideas show signs of paying off MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHere are the potential candidates still eyeing 2020 bids Warren policy ideas show signs of paying off Hillicon Valley: Florida county that backed Trump was one of two hacked by Russians | Sandberg pushes back on calls to break up Facebook | Conservative groups ask WH to end Amazon talks over Pentagon contract MORE (D-Calif.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenHere are the potential candidates still eyeing 2020 bids Sanders unveils education plan that would ban for-profit charter schools Warren policy ideas show signs of paying off MORE (D-Mass.) and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegButtigieg accuses Trump of 'paying lip service' to LGBT rights Warren policy ideas show signs of paying off Overnight Health Care — Presented by Campaign for Accountability — Momentum builds for federal laws enshrining abortion rights | Missouri lawmakers approve bill banning abortions at 8 weeks | Warren unveils plan to protect abortion rights MORE.

Shaheen’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill.