DeSantis signs bill banning sanctuary cities

DeSantis signs bill banning sanctuary cities
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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisRonald Dion DeSantisFlorida gov says arrested Giuliani associate was seen as a top Trump supporter in the state Backlash erupts at video depicting Trump killing media, critics WHCA calls on Trump to denounce video depicting him shooting media outlets MORE (R) signed a bill on Friday to ban “sanctuary cities” in the state.

The controversial bill, sponsored by state Rep. Cord Byrd (R), will prohibit “sanctuary” policies that protect undocumented immigrants from deportation. It will also require state and local law enforcement agencies to work with federal immigration officials to identify immigrants in Florida who don’t have legal status.

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The law mandates that law enforcement detain someone if there’s probable cause that they’re “removable” under federal immigration laws, The Miami Herald reports.

There are no sanctuary cities in Florida.

DeSantis tweeted he was “proud to sign the bill” to “uphold the rule of law and ensure that our communities are safe.”

During the signing, members of the crowd around DeSantis wore red “Make America Great Again” hats as they cheered in support of bill at the mention of President TrumpDonald John TrumpPelosi arrives in Jordan with bipartisan congressional delegation Trump says his Doral resort will no longer host G-7 after backlash CNN's Anderson Cooper mocks WH press secretary over Fox News interview MORE, The Associated Press reported.

Dozens tweeted praise and thanked DeSantis for signing the bill, with one user saying “I knew I moved to Florida for a reason.”

Critics say the measure is unconstitutional and violates the Fourth Amendment.

“The legislation inhumanely separates families, tearing apart parents and their children, while doing nothing to address legitimate public safety concerns,” Scott McCoy, senior policy counsel for the Southern Poverty Law Center Action Fund, wrote in a statement. “This can have traumatic long-term effects on our youth and our communities.”

With the bill set to go into effect next month, legal challenges to its constitutionality are expected, The Miami Herald reported.