GOP state lawmaker: 'Republican Party is enabling white supremacy in our country'

A Republican state senator from Nebraska on Sunday accused the GOP of helping to enable white supremacy.

"The Republican Party is enabling white supremacy in our country," state Sen. John McCollister (R) tweeted.

"As a lifelong Republican, it pains me to say this, but it’s the truth," McCollister continued. "I of course am not suggesting that all Republicans are white supremacists nor am I saying that the average Republican is even racist. What I am saying though is that the Republican Party is COMPLICIT to obvious racist and immoral activity inside our party." 

McCollister's comments come after two mass shootings, in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, shocked the country over the weekend and left at least 29 people dead.

Patrick Wood Crusius, the alleged gunman in the El Paso shooting, is believed to have written a racist, anti-immigrant manifesto before the attack, which described fears of a Latino “invasion."

Several Democrats have drawn a link between Crusius's alleged motives and President TrumpDonald John TrumpJulián Castro: It's time for House Democrats to 'do something' about Trump Warren: Congress is 'complicit' with Trump 'by failing to act' Sanders to join teachers, auto workers striking in Midwest MORE’s rhetoric on immigration, claiming that the president helped create the climate that led to the attack.

McCollister made the same argument Sunday, criticizing Trump.

"We have a Republican president who continually stokes racist fears in his base," he tweeted. "He calls certain countries 'sh*tholes,' tells women of color to 'go back' to where they came from and lies more than he tells the truth."

"We have Republican senators and representatives who look the other way and say nothing for fear that it will negatively affect their elections. No more. When the history books are written, I refuse to be someone who said nothing."

Trump on Sunday said that “hate has no place in our country" in response to the shootings. Critics say the president has consistently downplayed the threat of white nationalism.

“I don’t really," he said when asked in March if he thinks it presents a rising threat. "I think it’s a small group of people that have a very serious problem.”

On Monday, in an address, Trump said the nation must confront hatred.

"The shooter in El Paso posted a manifesto online consumed with racist hate,” Trump said during a speech on the shootings.

“In one voice, our nation must condemn bigotry, hatred and white supremacy. These sinister ideologies must be defeated. Hate has no place in America. Hatred warps the mind, ravages the heart and devours the soul."