SPONSORED:

South Carolina gov declares state of emergency after Dorian shifts course

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster (R) declared a state of emergency on Saturday after the path for Hurricane Dorian shifted to possibly threaten the state. 

McMaster signed an executive order Saturday putting the South Carolina Emergency Operations Plan into effect. 

"Given the strength and unpredictability of the storm, we must prepare for every possible scenario," the governor tweeted. "State assets are being mobilized now and Team South Carolina is working around the clock to be ready, if necessary."

"We encourage all South Carolinians who may be impacted by Hurricane Dorian to be vigilant and prepare now – there is no reason for delay," he added.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said Saturday that Dorian had shifted its path and could threaten Georgia and the Carolinas in addition to Florida. The Category 4 storm's winds had also reached speeds of up to 150 miles per hour, NHC director Ken Graham said in a Facebook Live video. 

ADVERTISEMENT

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rages against '60 Minutes' for interview with Krebs Cornyn spox: Neera Tanden has 'no chance' of being confirmed as Biden's OMB pick Pa. lawmaker was informed of positive coronavirus test while meeting with Trump: report MORE on Saturday also commented on Dorian's projected route change, tweeting, "Looking like our great South Carolina could get hit MUCH harder than first thought. Georgia and North Carolina also."

"It’s moving around and very hard to predict, except that it is one of the biggest and strongest (and really wide) that we have seen in decades. Be safe!" he added.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisRon DeSantisThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump, Biden clash over transition holdup, pandemic plans Group of Florida mayors calls on DeSantis to issue mask mandate DeSantis promises to keep Florida open despite recent coronavirus case surge MORE (R) also declared a state of emergency ahead of the storm.