Trump Jr making $50k for Florida speech

Trump Jr making $50k for Florida speech
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Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpMelania Trump's 'Be Best' hashtag trends after president goes after Greta Thunberg Trump Jr. blasts Time for choosing 'marketing gimmick' Greta Thunberg as Person of the Year White House calls Democratic witness's mentioning of president's youngest son 'classless' MORE and Kimberly Guilfoyle, a senior adviser for President TrumpDonald John TrumpRepublicans aim to avoid war with White House over impeachment strategy New York Times editorial board calls for Trump's impeachment Trump rips Michigan Rep. Dingell after Fox News appearance: 'Really pathetic!' MORE's 2020 campaign, will earn $50,000 from University of Florida students' activity fees to speak on campus.

The two, who are dating, will give a keynote presentation starting at 7 p.m. on Oct. 10 and will then answer questions from the audience for 15 minutes, according to ACCENT Speakers Bureau, the student organization planning the event.

The group uses student activity fees that amount to $19.06 per credit to pay for activities, including paying guest speakers, the Tampa Bay Times reported. Students are allowed to reserve one ticket each, and the public will be able to get any extra tickets for free. 

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Compared to other paid speakers at the university, Trump Jr. and Guilfoyle's paycheck does not reach the levels of other high-profile speakers at the university, with Kevin O'Leary, the former "Shark Tank" star, earning $95,000 and musical artist Pitbull bringing in $130,000. 

Trump Jr. and Guilfoyle previously visited Penn State University in April to talk about the president, obstacles conservative university students face, special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerJeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay Trump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts MORE's report and the "Green New Deal." About 700 people attended, according to the Florida newspaper.