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Cuomo signs measure allowing New York to press charges despite presidential pardon

Cuomo signs measure allowing New York to press charges despite presidential pardon
© UPI Photo

Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoFormer Cuomo aide says governor kissed her without consent Cuomo job approval drops 6 points amid nursing home controversy: poll Cruz blames criticism of Cancun trip on media 'Trump withdrawal' MORE (D) signed a measure Wednesday permitting New York state to press charges against those who have received presidential pardons. 

The measure was passed to prevent President TrumpDonald TrumpSenators given no timeline on removal of National Guard, Capitol fence Democratic fury with GOP explodes in House Georgia secretary of state withholds support for 'reactionary' GOP voting bills MORE's ex-aides who are facing prison time or potential sentencing from receiving pardons and avoiding criminal punishment, NBC News reported. The network added that the legislation was a direct response to the president's consideration of giving his former campaign manager, Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortNew York court rules Manafort can't be prosecuted by Manhattan DA Would Trump have gotten away with a self-pardon? History will never know Trump's pardons harshly criticized by legal experts MORE, a pardon.

Manafort is serving in a federal prison after being convicted on bank fraud, tax evasion and conspiracy charges. The Manhattan District Attorney's Office has also indicted him on state mortgage fraud charges.

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The New York State Assembly and the state's senate passed the bill in May. 

It ends the "double jeopardy loophole," which prevents people from being prosecuted for crimes the federal government has already tried them for, according to NBC News. Under the legislation, state prosecutors can charge defendants who worked in the president's administration, campaign, nonprofit or businesses — including those pardoned by the president — if the alleged crimes occurred in New York.

Presidents are only able to pardon people for federal crimes, not state crimes, NBC News noted.

Two investigations based in New York are exploring the president's campaign and business dealings.