SPONSORED:

Cuomo signs measure allowing New York to press charges despite presidential pardon

Cuomo signs measure allowing New York to press charges despite presidential pardon
© UPI Photo

Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoHundreds removed by police from gathering in rented NY mansion New York will receive COVID-19 vaccine for 170K people: Cuomo Dreaming of space exploration? You're better off riding bikes MORE (D) signed a measure Wednesday permitting New York state to press charges against those who have received presidential pardons. 

The measure was passed to prevent President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal watchdog accuses VOA parent company of wrongdoing under Trump appointee Lawsuit alleges 200K Georgia voters were wrongly purged from registration list Ivanka Trump gives deposition in lawsuit alleging misuse of inauguration funds MORE's ex-aides who are facing prison time or potential sentencing from receiving pardons and avoiding criminal punishment, NBC News reported. The network added that the legislation was a direct response to the president's consideration of giving his former campaign manager, Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortFor the Trump-haters, everything is a crime 3 take-aways from the Michael Flynn pardon Flynn spurs questions of who Trump might pardon next MORE, a pardon.

Manafort is serving in a federal prison after being convicted on bank fraud, tax evasion and conspiracy charges. The Manhattan District Attorney's Office has also indicted him on state mortgage fraud charges.

ADVERTISEMENT

The New York State Assembly and the state's senate passed the bill in May. 

It ends the "double jeopardy loophole," which prevents people from being prosecuted for crimes the federal government has already tried them for, according to NBC News. Under the legislation, state prosecutors can charge defendants who worked in the president's administration, campaign, nonprofit or businesses — including those pardoned by the president — if the alleged crimes occurred in New York.

Presidents are only able to pardon people for federal crimes, not state crimes, NBC News noted.

Two investigations based in New York are exploring the president's campaign and business dealings.