Maryland Republicans criticize high school lesson comparing Trump to Nazis, communists

A high school in Baltimore is drawing the ire of some local Republican lawmakers over a slideshow that was presented to students that shows a picture of President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden campaign: Trump and former vice president will have phone call about coronavirus Esper: Military personnel could help treat coronavirus patients 'if push comes to shove' Schumer calls for military official to act as medical equipment czar MORE along with a Nazi symbol that is captioned “been there.”

According to The Baltimore Sun, the slideshow was shown to students in an Advanced Placement (AP) history class at Loch Raven High School.

Maryland State Del. Kathy Szeliga (R) shared a photo of the apparent slide in question from the presentation on Facebook over the weekend and labeled it “educational malfeasance of the highest degree.” 

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“This propaganda was used in an AP history class at Loch Raven High. Educational malfeasance of the highest degree,” she wrote on Facebook. “What is going on in our the Balt Co Public Schools???? I will be demanding answers and actions from BCPS TODAY!” 

The photo of the slide shows a picture of Trump with the words “wants to round up a group of people to build a giant wall.” Below that picture is another one depicting a Nazi symbol that captioned “been there” and another showing a communist hammer and sickle with the words “done that.” 

On the side of the slide are the words “oh, THAT is why it sounds so familiar!” 

Szeliga also shared a quote from Baltimore County Public Schools regarding the matter.

In the statement, the district said the slide had been used as part of an AP history lesson in which topics “being discussed included World Wars and the attempts by some leaders to limit, or prevent migration, into certain countries.” 

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“In isolation and out of context with the lesson, the image could be misunderstood. In our Advanced Placement (AP) classes, which are college level courses, we expect and encourage analysis and discussion around historical and current events even if they are considered controversial,” the district continued.

“This lesson was not intended to make a political statement. If a student has concerns when discussing a controversial issue, schools have the tools to address the concern and support the student,” the district also said in the statement.

Baltimore County Councilman Wade Kach (R) took aim at the slideshow in a statement to The Baltimore Sun. 

“I think it is inappropriate in a high school to have something like that that is so controversial,” he told the paper. He reportedly added that he doesn’t think it was right “to in any way try to draw a comparison to the president and the communists or the Nazis.”

In further comment provided to the paper, Charles Herndon, a representative for the school district, said the issue had become a personnel matter that "will be appropriately addressed by the school administration and is not subject to further clarification."

The Hill has reached out to the school district for additional comment.