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Michigan attorney general: Trump's lawsuits insinuate 'Black people are corrupt'

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel (D) condemned President TrumpDonald TrumpNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 MORE on Wednesday, accusing him and his campaign of lacking faith in Black voters in their lawsuits against the state questioning the legitimacy of the results of last week's election.

"Really the themes that we see, that persist, are this: Black people are corrupt, Black people are incompetent and Black people can’t be trusted. That’s the narrative that is continually espoused by the Trump campaign and their allies in these lawsuits," Nessel said during a press call, according to the Detroit Free Press.

Nessel pointed out that some of Trump's lawsuits allege ballot-counting issues and fraud in Detroit, which has a high Black population and has traditionally voted Democratic, while ignoring majority-white counties such as Oakland and Kent that also voted for President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors Biden celebrates vaccine approval but warns 'current improvement could reverse' MORE.

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The Trump campaign on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against Wayne County, Michigan, which has a population that is more than 38 percent Black, citing irregularities in vote tabulation.

Nessel has denied that there is any cause for the lawsuits, telling the Detroit Free Press that they are "demonstrably false" and that there is no evidence to support claims of election tampering.

She said that if she were to file suits that were "this baseless and this frivolous, I would be sanctioned and I would likely be looking at a loss of licensure."

The lawsuits, which legal experts doubt will succeed, face an uphill climb to change the official outcome in Michigan, where Biden leads by nearly 145,000 votes.

Election results are expected to be certified within the state on Nov. 23, should the courts not intervene, according to the Detroit Free Press.

Trump and many Republicans who support him have refused to acknowledge Biden as the election's winner, claiming without evidence that there has been widespread fraud in swing states that went for the former vice president.