Hogan says lawmakers' 'scheme' to overturn election results 'makes a mockery of our system'

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) said Sunday that Republican lawmakers’ “scheme” to overturn the presidential election results “makes a mockery of our system.”

The Maryland governor released a statement opposing the effort that dozens of Republican lawmakers plan to undertake this week to contest President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenFive takeaways from the Ohio special primaries FDA aims to give full approval to Pfizer vaccine by Labor Day: report Overnight Defense: Police officer killed in violence outside Pentagon | Biden officials back repeal of Iraq War authorization | NSC pushed to oversee 'Havana Syndrome' response MORE’s election victory over President TrumpDonald TrumpFive takeaways from the Ohio special primaries Missouri Rep. Billy Long enters Senate GOP primary Trump-backed Mike Carey wins GOP primary in Ohio special election MORE

“The scheme by members of Congress to reject the certification of the presidential election makes a mockery of our system and who we are as Americans,” Hogan said. 

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Hogan argued Trump and his legal team “have had every opportunity to provide evidence supporting their claims” of widespread voter fraud in the election, but “they have failed to do so.”

“Their allegations have been flatly rejected by Trump-appointed judges and a Trump-appointed Justice Department alike,” the GOP governor said.  

“Whether or not you like the result, the process worked as it always has,” he said. “What’s not working is that far too many politicians in Washington seem to have forgotten the basic principle that they are beholden to the people, not the other way around.”

The Republican governor, who voted for the deceased former President Reagan this election, expressed his disapproval as several Republicans in the House and Senate plan to disrupt Congress’s certification of Biden’s win on Wednesday by challenging the Electoral College vote. 

The congressional certification of the Electoral College is usually a formality, but the dozens of Republicans in both chambers aim to garner enough support for objections to the vote in order to send the matter to the mostly Republican state legislatures.

But the effort is unlikely to overturn the election as Democrats hold control of the House and several Republican leaders and senators have indicated they would not support the move.

Trump has refused to concede to Biden although Biden has been widely recognized as the president-elect since Nov. 7. Instead Trump and his legal team challenged the election results, including through unsuccessful lawsuits, citing unfounded claims of widespread voter fraud.