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Ex-Michigan governor to be charged over Flint water crisis: report

Ex-Michigan governor to be charged over Flint water crisis: report

Former Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder (R) on Tuesday was informed that he and other top former state officials including the Michigan health director will face charges resulting from an investigation into the Flint water crisis, The Associated Press reported Tuesday.

Defense attorneys were informed by the state attorney general's office to expect an initial court appearance soon, the AP reported, citing two people familiar with the prosecution. The two sources familiar with the matter spoke to the wire service on the condition on anonymity because they were not allowed to speak publicly about the charges.

The specific charges Snyder and his former top officials will face were not named. 

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A spokesperson for the state AG told the AP that state officials "will share more [information about the charges] as soon as we’re in a position to do so.”

The Hill has reached out to both the Michigan attorney general's office. 

Michigan Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibBiden and the new Congress must protect Americans from utility shutoffs Overnight Energy: EPA rule exempts many polluting industries from future air regulations | Ex-Michigan governor to be charged over Flint water crisis: report | Officials ousted from White House after papers casting doubt on climate science Ex-Michigan governor to be charged over Flint water crisis: report MORE (D), whose district includes parts of Detroit, tweeted her approval of the news Tuesday afternoon, writing: "The justice train is coming through."

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Snyder's administration was heavily criticized over the water crisis, which exposed thousands of Flint residents including young children to water with dangerously high levels of lead. Lead is an element that can cause brain damage and other defects with high exposure.

The water supply issue was linked to an outbreak of Legionnaire's Disease which sickened dozens in the area. 

Scientists determined in February 2019 that the drinking water provided by the city's taps was finally safe to drink, an outcome that resulted from years of efforts to replace and reinforce piping across the city.

However, due to the toil, much skepticism toward the water system reportedly remains among the city's populace.