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Minneapolis beefs up security ahead of former officer's trial in George Floyd death

 Minneapolis beefs up security ahead of former officer's trial in George Floyd death
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The city of Minneapolis is beefing up security ahead of the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, who faces murder and manslaughter charges in the death of George Floyd.

The city announced that Minnesota Gov. Tim WalzTim WalzJudge limits courtroom to one George Floyd family member at a time during Chauvin trial Minneapolis beefs up security ahead of former officer's trial in George Floyd death Officials: Barr blocked officer plea deal in George Floyd death MORE (D) activated the state's National Guard to provide public safety assistance to Minneapolis and Saint Paul during the trials of the officers involved. 

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob FreyJacob Frey Minneapolis beefs up security ahead of former officer's trial in George Floyd death Owners of destroyed Minneapolis restaurant sue city, mayor for 'failed' leadership in response to unrest Minneapolis police fatally shoot man during traffic stop, chief to release body cam footage MORE (D) said during a news conference on Wednesday that by the time the verdict is read, up to 2,000 National Guardsmen and 1,100 other law enforcement officers from 12 different jurisdictions will be activated.

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The city said in a statement that it has already begun installing a security perimeter around the Hennepin County Government Center, City Hall and other buildings nearby in preparation for the trial.

The city also plans to develop guidance for businesses and property owners to take additional security measures that will allow them to remain open.

“What we’ve seen in so many other cities as we lead into trials involving Black men that have been killed by police officers — there’s great frustration, there’s anxiety and there’s trauma,” Frey said during the news conference.

“We anticipate that trauma increasing as we get closer into jury deliberations and the verdict, and we believe that it is on us to honor the magnitude of this moment and ensure that our families in this city feel safe,” he said.

Floyd died last May after Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. His death sparked nationwide protests that were mostly peaceful, but some did turn violent.

Chauvin is facing second-degree murder and manslaughter charges for his role in Floyd’s killing. Jury selection in the trial is scheduled to begin on March 8.

Hennepin County District Judge Peter Cahill ruled last month that Chauvin will face trial separately from former officers J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas K. Lane and Tou Thao, who are charged with aiding and abetting manslaughter. The other three officers will stand trial on Aug. 23.