Wisconsin hunters break wolf kill quota in first season after Trump lifted protections

Wisconsin hunters break wolf kill quota in first season after Trump lifted protections
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Wisconsin's Department of Natural Resources (DNR) abruptly ended the state's first wolf hunting season since 2014 Wednesday after hunters exceeded the quota of wolves they were allowed to kill in all six of the state's management zones.

The Associated Press reported hunters killed 53 percent more wolves than allowed in the first 72 hours of a season that was supposed to last a week. It was the first wolf hunting season after former President TrumpDonald TrumpGrant Woods, longtime friend of McCain and former Arizona AG, dies at 67 Super PACs release ad campaign hitting Vance over past comments on Trump Glasgow summit raises stakes for Biden deal MORE's administration removed the animal from the endangered species list.

The Department of Natural Resources said that 178 wolves were killed, exceeding the set amount of 119 wolves. That number is expected to go up as hunters have 24 hours to report their kills. 

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Wisconsin law requires wolf hunts be conducted between November and February. DNR had been planning for a November season, to give itself time to determine a reasonable kill quota and figure out how to work around a Native American treaty in the state. But hunting groups, fearful the Biden administration would relist wolves as endangered, successfully sued the state to have a season before February ended, the Wisconsin State Journal reported.

Animal rights groups were outraged at the original decision to hold the hunt, especially during wolf mating season. 

Hunters were allowed to use traps, hunt at night and use dogs to track and kill the wolves. 

Center for Biological Diversity called the hunt “a reckless slaughter” after learning that the quota was exceeded in the first three days, according to The Associated Press.

Those who wanted the hunt said that a hunt was necessary because wolves go after their livestock and pets.