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De Blasio on latest Cuomo accusations: 'He can no longer serve as governor'

De Blasio on latest Cuomo accusations: 'He can no longer serve as governor'
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New York City Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioThe Hill's Morning Report - Dems to go-it-alone on infrastructure as bipartisan plan falters NYC progressives anxiously watch Maya Wiley's ascent The Memo: New York City mayoral race is harbinger for politics of crime MORE (D) said on Thursday that New York Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoMorgan Stanley CEO urges workers to return to office: 'If you want to get paid New York rates, you work in New York' The Hill's Morning Report - Dems to go-it-alone on infrastructure as bipartisan plan falters Puerto Rico's former governor stages a comeback MORE (D) can “no longer serve as governor” in light of the most recent allegation of inappropriate behavior with women leveled against him.

During a press briefing on Thursday de Blasio called the latest allegation against Cuomo "deeply troubling."

"The specific allegation that the governor called an employee of his, someone who he had power over, called them to a private place and then sexually assaulted her is absolutely unacceptable. It is disgusting to me and he can no longer serve as governor. It's as simple as that," de Blasio said.

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The Times Union of Albany reported Wednesday that a former aid said Cuomo invited her to the Executive Mansion last year where he groped her. Cuomo allegedly called the aide to his home to help with a cellphone issue, but when she arrived he closed the door put his hand under her blouse.

"As I said yesterday, I have never done anything like this. The details of this report are gut-wrenching. I am not going to speak to the specifics of this or any other allegation given the ongoing review, but I am confident in the result of the attorney general’s report,” Cuomo said in the statement to The Hill when reached for a response to this allegation.

The woman is the sixth to level an allegation of inappropriate behavior against Cuomo.

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De Blasio has previously said that he believes Cuomo should resign if the allegations against him are corroborated. 

“If someone purposely tried to use their power to force a woman to have sex with them, of course that’s someone who should no longer be in public service," the mayor said in a February press briefing.

More than 55 Democratic New York Assembly members called for Cuomo to resign on Thursday in a letter. The lawmakers directly cited the allegations from six former aides as well as the revelation that Cuomo's office had altered data on COVID-19 nursing home deaths.

In the letter, the assembly members voiced support for New York Attorney General Letitia James's (D) investigation into the allegations and called for it to continue.

“In the meantime, the Governor needs to put the people of New York first. We have a Lieutenant Governor who can step in and lead for the remainder of the term, and this is what is best for New Yorkers in this critical time. It is time for Governor Cuomo to resign," they wrote.