SPONSORED:

Arkansas governor allows bill targeting critical race theory in state agencies to become law

Arkansas governor allows bill targeting critical race theory in state agencies to become law
© Getty Images

Arkansas Gov. Asa HutchinsonAsa HutchinsonGenetic material from 1993 killing revealed years after another man executed for crime, groups say Arkansas governor allows bill targeting critical race theory in state agencies to become law Pennsylvania gov says he'll veto ban on transgender athletes in women's sports MORE (R) on Monday allowed a bill targeting "critical race theory" in state agencies to become law without his signature.

The Associated Press reported that Hutchinson refused to sign the legislation and said that it "does not address any problem that exists" — but he did not attempt to veto it, either.

The legislation bars state agencies from teaching any "divisive" concepts during racial and cultural sensitivity trainings, including any concept that teaches that the U.S. is an inherently racist nation.

ADVERTISEMENT

"[T]he paperwork and manpower requirements are unnecessary," Hutchinson said in a statement, according to the AP.

Arkansas's newest law is one of several being advanced by GOP legislatures around the country aimed at addressing critical race theory, a new frequent target of conservative ire that many right-leaning politicians have blamed for advancing progressive views on race and culture.

A group of Republican senators led by Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell: Taliban could take over Afghanistan by 'the end of the year' McConnell alma mater criticizes him for 1619 comments McConnell amid Trump criticism: 'I'm looking forward, not backward' MORE (Ky.) recently wrote to President BidenJoe BidenAtlanta mayor won't run for reelection South Carolina governor to end pandemic unemployment benefits in June Airplane pollution set to soar with post-pandemic travel boom MORE's Education secretary, Miguel CardonaMiguel CardonaOvernight Health Care: Moderna says COVID-19 vaccine 96 percent effective in teens | Nearly 940,000 sign up for ObamaCare coverage in special enrollment Education secretary expects all schools to fully reopen in-person in fall Jill Biden a key figure in push to pitch White House plans MORE, arguing that a proposed rule promoting education programs addressing systemic racism is "divisive nonsense."

“Families did not ask for this divisive nonsense. Voters did not vote for it,” the senators wrote. “Americans never decided our children should be taught that our country is inherently evil.”