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Arkansas governor allows bill targeting critical race theory in state agencies to become law

Arkansas governor allows bill targeting critical race theory in state agencies to become law
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Arkansas Gov. Asa HutchinsonAsa HutchinsonRepublican governor of Arkansas says 'Trump is dividing our party' Genetic material from 1993 killing revealed years after another man executed for crime, groups say Arkansas governor allows bill targeting critical race theory in state agencies to become law MORE (R) on Monday allowed a bill targeting "critical race theory" in state agencies to become law without his signature.

The Associated Press reported that Hutchinson refused to sign the legislation and said that it "does not address any problem that exists" — but he did not attempt to veto it, either.

The legislation bars state agencies from teaching any "divisive" concepts during racial and cultural sensitivity trainings, including any concept that teaches that the U.S. is an inherently racist nation.

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"[T]he paperwork and manpower requirements are unnecessary," Hutchinson said in a statement, according to the AP.

Arkansas's newest law is one of several being advanced by GOP legislatures around the country aimed at addressing critical race theory, a new frequent target of conservative ire that many right-leaning politicians have blamed for advancing progressive views on race and culture.

A group of Republican senators led by Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate panel deadlocks in vote on sweeping elections bill Senate descends into hours-long fight over elections bill Republican governor of Arkansas says 'Trump is dividing our party' MORE (Ky.) recently wrote to President BidenJoe BidenKinzinger, Gaetz get in back-and-forth on Twitter over Cheney vote Cheney in defiant floor speech: Trump on 'crusade to undermine our democracy' US officials testify on domestic terrorism in wake of Capitol attack MORE's Education secretary, Miguel CardonaMiguel CardonaBiden administration reversing Trump ban on pandemic aid for undocumented students House Republicans press Biden Education secretary on reopening outreach White House posts visitor logs for first time since Obama MORE, arguing that a proposed rule promoting education programs addressing systemic racism is "divisive nonsense."

“Families did not ask for this divisive nonsense. Voters did not vote for it,” the senators wrote. “Americans never decided our children should be taught that our country is inherently evil.”