Alabama officer convicted of murder stays on city payroll

Alabama officer convicted of murder stays on city payroll
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An Alabama police officer who was taken off duty after a murder conviction will continue to receive a paycheck from the city of Huntsville, The Associated Press reported Tuesday.

Officer William Darby was convicted on Friday of murdering a suicidal man, Jeffrey Parker, in 2018.

Following his conviction by a Madison County jury, Darby went on leave Monday from the desk duty he was assigned to after the incident. He will continue to receive pay while out on $100,000 bond.

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"This is the normal process until formal proceedings under the City of Huntsville’s personnel policies and procedures are complete," Huntsville city spokeswoman Lucy DeButy said, according to the AP.

"William Darby was placed on paid administrative leave Monday, May 10. This is the normal process until formal proceedings under the City of Huntsville’s personnel policies and procedures are complete," Huntsville spokeswoman Lucy DeButy told The Hill.

"Mr. Darby has been removed from the ranks of being an active, sworn officer," DeButy added.

Alabama Democratic Party Executive Director Wade Perry slammed the city for continuing to pay Darby.

"He’s a convicted murderer. He shouldn’t get another day’s pay. Fire him. And the police chief," Perry said in a statement, the AP reported.

Parker, 49, had reportedly called 911 for help, saying he was armed and suicidal. When he didn't lower his weapon, which was not aimed at officers, Darby shot him in the face.

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Genisha Pegues, a senior officer to Darby, testified that she was already on the scene deescalating the situation when Darby arrived, according to AL.com.

Defense attorney Robert Tuten argued that Parker could have shot at the officers and was not following Darby's orders. Tuten said that Darby will appeal his conviction.

A city review board cleared Darby of any wrongdoing, according to the AP.

Darby faces up to life in prison for the shooting. His sentencing is expected in about six weeks, the AP reported, citing a prosecutor.

--Updated at 2:43 p.m.