State Watch

The cities and states marking Indigenous Peoples’ Day for the first time

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A growing number of states and cities are marking Indigenous Peoples’ Day for the first time this year, with some entirely ditching Monday’s federally recognized Columbus Day holiday.

President Biden on Friday issued the first presidential proclamation for Indigenous Peoples’ Day, saying federal policies for generations had sought to systematically eradicate native cultures.

“Today, we recognize Indigenous peoples’ resilience and strength as well as the immeasurable positive impact that they have made on every aspect of American society,” Biden wrote. “We also recommit to supporting a new, brighter future of promise and equity for Tribal Nations.”

Here’s a list of some of the states and cities recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ Day in some form for the first time this year:


Arlington, Mass.

The Boston suburb voted in April to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

 

Athens, Ga.

The Athens-Clarke County Commission and mayor passed a resolution Tuesday designating the second Monday of October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day.


Boston

Mayor Kim Janey (D) signed an executive order Wednesday designating Indigenous Peoples’ Day annually on the second Monday in October.


Easthampton, Mass.

The Easthampton City Council voted in March to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day.


Fresno, Calif.

The Fresno City Council on Sept. 30 signed a proclamation designating Monday as Indigenous Peoples’ Day.


Hartford, Conn.

The Hartford City Council passed a resolution late last month replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day.


Holyoke, Mass.

The Holyoke City Council voted in June to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day.


Indianapolis

The City-County Council in Indianapolis voted in December to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day.


Manchester, N.H.

The Board of Mayor and Aldermen voted in November to designate the first Monday in October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day, while recognizing Columbus Day on the second Monday of the month.


Manitou Springs, Colo.

The Manitou Springs City Council voted in February to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day.


Nebraska

The state legislature passed a law last year recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ Day alongside Columbus Day.


Newburyport, Mass.

The Newburyport City Council voted late last month to recognize Indigenous Peoples’ Day, The Daily News of Newburyport reported.


Oregon

The state legislature passed a law earlier this year designating Indigenous Peoples’ Day annually on the second Monday in October.


Philadelphia

Mayor James Kenney (D) signed an executive order in January replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day and designating Juneteenth as an official city holiday.


Plattsburgh, N.Y.

Plattsburgh’s mayor issued a proclamation Thursday designating Indigenous Peoples’ Day on the second Monday in October.


Tempe, Ariz.

The Tempe City Council voted last month to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day.


Texas

The state legislature passed a resolution earlier this year designating the second week in October as Indigenous Peoples’ Week.


West Lafayette, Ind.

The city’s government voted last week to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

 

Updated at 10:04 p.m. on Oct. 12.

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