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GOP senator predicts ‘fiscal crisis’ without changes to Medicaid

Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) on Sunday defended the proposed Medicaid cuts included in the Senate GOP’s healthcare bill. He said the cuts prevent the program’s cost from “ballooning” the deficit over time.

"If we leave it on the path it's on now, we will have a fiscal crisis," Toomey said on "Sunday Morning Futures.”

“Our deficits will balloon to the point that they are completely unmanageable," he added.

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Toomey, who was one of the few lawmakers who helped craft the repeal-and-replace bill behind closed doors, said the new bill will help prevent Medicaid from "growing out of control."

The legislation puts a new cap in place that would prevent Medicaid spending from rising as quickly as medical costs. States would then either have to pick up the bill and pay out of their own state budgets to make up for the difference or scale back Medicaid enrollment or services. 

Toomey said that ObamaCare is a failed healthcare system that needs to be replaced.

“ObamaCare has failed us terribly, it continues to fail and we need to move in a different direction," Toomey continued, saying the GOP's new version is a "step in the right direction."

The Pennsylvania lawmaker said Senate efforts to get enough support for the bill is a “work in progress.” There are several Republican senators who oppose the bill in its current form.

Many Democrats and some GOP lawmakers such as Sens. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGraham wants to review ActBlue's source of small-dollar contributions GOP blocks Schumer effort to adjourn Senate until after election Candymakers meet virtually with lawmakers for annual fly-in, discuss Halloween safety MORE (Ohio), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid Senate is leaning to the Democrats, big time, with a wave MORE (Maine) and Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (Nev.) have voiced concerns about the bill.

The Congressional Budget Office analysis of the measure found that it would leave 22 million more people uninsured over a decade.  

The GOP opposition to the bill in the Senate forced Republican leadership to delay a vote until after the July Fourth recess.