McConnell: I'd be happy to bring a health-care bill to the floor if I know Trump will sign it

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHillary Clinton: Voter suppression has led to 'crisis in democracy' in the US New York Times authors blame Kavanaugh correction on editing error: 'There was zero intent to mislead' The Hill's Morning Report - What is Trump's next move on Iran? MORE (R-Ky.) said on Sunday he would be willing to bring a health-care bill to the Senate floor if he had confidence President Trump would sign it into law. 

"I'm not certain yet what the president is looking for here, but I'll be happy to bring a bill to the floor if I know President Trump will sign it," McConnell told CNN's Dana Bash on "State of the Union." 

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"What I'm waiting for is to hear from President Trump what kind of health-care bill he might sign. If there's a need for some kind of interim step here to stabilize the market, we need a bill the president will actually sign," he continued. 

The Senate leader's comments come after Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar Alexander The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Liberal group urges Senate panel to vote against Scalia as Labor secretary Suburban anxiety drives GOP on guns MORE (R-Tenn.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care: Juul's lobbying efforts fall short as Trump moves to ban flavored e-cigarettes | Facebook removes fact check from anti-abortion video after criticism | Poll: Most Democrats want presidential candidate who would build on ObamaCare Trump's sinking polls embolden Democrats to play hardball Democrats threaten to withhold defense votes over wall MORE (D-Wash.) introduced legislation to stabilize ObamaCare markets. 

Trump slammed the bipartisan deal on Wednesday, saying on Twitter that he could not support "bailing out" insurance companies, which he accused of making huge profits from ObamaCare.

However, the president appeared to backtrack on Thursday, saying he could be open to a bipartisan short-term ObamaCare stabilization deal in the upper chamber. 

“We will probably like a very short-term solution until we hit the block grants,” Trump said. “If they can do something like that, I'm open to it.”

Trump has pushed for the Republican-majority Congress to pass ObamaCare repeal and replace legislation. The Senate has so far failed to do so.