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Sanders: Middle-class tax cuts in GOP bill a ‘very good thing’ that should have been permanent

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersTrump attacks ‘Crazy Bernie’ Sanders over Medicare plans Overnight Defense: Trump says 'rogue killers' could be behind missing journalist | Sends Pompeo to meet Saudi king | Saudis may claim Khashoggi killed by accident | Ex-VA chief talks White House 'chaos' | Most F-35s cleared for flight Overnight Energy: Trump administration doubles down on climate skepticism | Suspended EPA health official hits back | Military bases could host coal, gas exports MORE (I-Vt.) on Sunday agreed the tax cuts for the middle class in the GOP tax bill are a "very good thing" — but added they should have been made permanent.

"That's why we should've made the tax breaks for the middle class permanent. But what the Republicans did is made the tax breaks for corporations permanent, the tax breaks for the middle class temporary," Sanders told CNN's Jake Tapper on "State of the Union."

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"Meanwhile, at the end of 10 years, well over 80 billion Americans are paying more in taxes. Thirteen million Americans, as a result of this legislation, lose their health insurance. Health premiums are going up. You've got a $1.4 trillion deficit as a result of this bill. And [Speaker] Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanElection Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight Paul Ryan to campaign for 25 vulnerable House Republicans GOP super PAC pushes back on report it skipped ad buys for California's Rohrabacher, Walters MORE [R-Wis.] is going around saying 'Oh, we have to offset that deficit by cutting Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid,' " he continued. 

"To answer your question, should we have focused on the needs of the middle class? We should have," he said.

Sanders's comments come after President TrumpDonald John TrumpKey takeaways from the Arizona Senate debate Major Hollywood talent firm considering rejecting Saudi investment money: report Mattis says he thought 'nothing at all' about Trump saying he may leave administration MORE signed the GOP-backed tax plan into law on Friday, marking his first major legislative win as president. 

Republicans have boasted about the tax cuts Americans would receive initially in the plan. However, Democrats and critics have pointed out those cuts will not last forever, pointing out that all individual tax cuts are due to expire by 2025, while corporate rate cuts were made to be permanent in the plan.