Sanders: Middle-class tax cuts in GOP bill a ‘very good thing’ that should have been permanent

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersEx-Obama official on Sanders-Warren feud: 'I don't think it played out well for either of them' Former Vermont Governor: Sanders 'will play dirty' Hill.TV's Krystal Ball rips Warren over feud with Sanders MORE (I-Vt.) on Sunday agreed the tax cuts for the middle class in the GOP tax bill are a "very good thing" — but added they should have been made permanent.

"That's why we should've made the tax breaks for the middle class permanent. But what the Republicans did is made the tax breaks for corporations permanent, the tax breaks for the middle class temporary," Sanders told CNN's Jake Tapper on "State of the Union."

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"Meanwhile, at the end of 10 years, well over 80 billion Americans are paying more in taxes. Thirteen million Americans, as a result of this legislation, lose their health insurance. Health premiums are going up. You've got a $1.4 trillion deficit as a result of this bill. And [Speaker] Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanEsper's chief of staff to depart at end of January Latinos say they didn't benefit from Trump tax cuts — here's why Conservative commentator rips Trump's signature tax overhaul: 'It was a big mistake' MORE [R-Wis.] is going around saying 'Oh, we have to offset that deficit by cutting Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid,' " he continued. 

"To answer your question, should we have focused on the needs of the middle class? We should have," he said.

Sanders's comments come after President TrumpDonald John TrumpLev Parnas implicates Rick Perry, says Giuliani had him pressure Ukraine to announce Biden probe Saudi Arabia paid 0 million for cost of US troops in area Parnas claims ex-Trump attorney visited him in jail, asked him to sacrifice himself for president MORE signed the GOP-backed tax plan into law on Friday, marking his first major legislative win as president. 

Republicans have boasted about the tax cuts Americans would receive initially in the plan. However, Democrats and critics have pointed out those cuts will not last forever, pointing out that all individual tax cuts are due to expire by 2025, while corporate rate cuts were made to be permanent in the plan.