Sanders: Middle-class tax cuts in GOP bill a ‘very good thing’ that should have been permanent

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersThe biggest challenge from the Mueller Report depends on the vigilance of everyone GOP Senate campaign arm hits battleground-state Dems over 'Medicare for All,' Green New Deal Warren unveils plan to cancel student loan debt, create universal free college MORE (I-Vt.) on Sunday agreed the tax cuts for the middle class in the GOP tax bill are a "very good thing" — but added they should have been made permanent.

"That's why we should've made the tax breaks for the middle class permanent. But what the Republicans did is made the tax breaks for corporations permanent, the tax breaks for the middle class temporary," Sanders told CNN's Jake Tapper on "State of the Union."

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"Meanwhile, at the end of 10 years, well over 80 billion Americans are paying more in taxes. Thirteen million Americans, as a result of this legislation, lose their health insurance. Health premiums are going up. You've got a $1.4 trillion deficit as a result of this bill. And [Speaker] Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAppeals court rules House chaplain can reject secular prayers FEC filing: No individuals donated to indicted GOP rep this cycle The Hill's Morning Report - Waiting on Mueller: Answers come on Thursday MORE [R-Wis.] is going around saying 'Oh, we have to offset that deficit by cutting Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid,' " he continued. 

"To answer your question, should we have focused on the needs of the middle class? We should have," he said.

Sanders's comments come after President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls Sri Lankan prime minister following church bombings Ex-Trump lawyer: Mueller knew Trump had to call investigation a 'witch hunt' for 'political reasons' The biggest challenge from the Mueller Report depends on the vigilance of everyone MORE signed the GOP-backed tax plan into law on Friday, marking his first major legislative win as president. 

Republicans have boasted about the tax cuts Americans would receive initially in the plan. However, Democrats and critics have pointed out those cuts will not last forever, pointing out that all individual tax cuts are due to expire by 2025, while corporate rate cuts were made to be permanent in the plan.