Dem senator compares negotiating with GOP to convincing kid to do homework

Dem senator compares negotiating with GOP to convincing kid to do homework

Sen. Christopher CoonsChris Andrew CoonsThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - White House, Dems play blame game over evictions Graham's COVID-19 'breakthrough' case jolts Senate Lack of transatlantic cooperation on trade threatens global climate change goals MORE (D-Del.) on Sunday compared trying to negotiate with Republicans to convincing his kids to keep doing their homework.

“It’s like Dad comes home at 8 and asks, ‘How are you doing on your homework?’ ‘Oh, making progress.’ At 9, ‘How we doing on that homework?’ ‘Making progress — What’s the big deal? It’s not due until tomorrow,' ” Coons said on “Fox News Sunday.”

Coons said Democrats want a guaranteed "commitment to move forward on all these issues we’ve been talking about” in order to negotiate a bill to reopen the government.

"It's overdue," Coons said.

The government shutdown stretched into its second day on Sunday after Senate Democrats and a small group of Republicans opposed a continuing resolution that would have funded the government for another few weeks.

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Coons said Democrats want votes on key issues, including the Children’s Health Insurance Program, disaster relief and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

Coons pushed back on the suggestion that Democrats were political “arsonists,” the term used by then-Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiLiz Cheney says her father is 'deeply troubled' about the state of the Republican Party 19 House Democrats call on Capitol physician to mandate vaccines Ohio special election: A good day for Democrats MORE (D-Calif.) to describe House Republicans who voted to shut down the government in 2013.

“Just because I voted against a temporary continuing resolution, I’m not an arsonist,” Coons said.

Coons said he believes a group of bipartisan senators is making progress on a solution. He said coming to an agreement is difficult, however, because President TrumpDonald TrumpMajority of Americans in new poll say it would be bad for the country if Trump ran in 2024 ,800 bottle of whiskey given to Pompeo by Japan is missing Liz Cheney says her father is 'deeply troubled' about the state of the Republican Party MORE has not indicated what deal he’d be willing to accept.

“At the end of the day, part of our challenge here is negotiating with a president who struggles to hear 'yes,' ” Coons said.

“I have a lot of sympathy for [Senate Majority] Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Trump asks court to block release of tax returns to Congress | Private sector adds 330K jobs in July, well short of expectations Senate panel advances first three spending bills McConnell lays out GOP demands for government-funding deal MORE [R-Ky.], who said on Friday night, ‘How am I supposed to negotiate on this issue when we still don’t know what president will accept?’ ” Coons added.