Bill Clinton: I couldn’t be elected now because I don’t like embarrassing people

Bill Clinton: I couldn’t be elected now because I don’t like embarrassing people

Former President Clinton said in an interview broadcast early Sunday that he doesn’t think he could be elected now because he doesn’t like embarrassing people the way President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rallies in Nevada amid Supreme Court flurry: 'We're gonna get Brett' Trump: 'Good news' that Obama is campaigning again Trump boosts Heller, hammers 'Wacky Jacky' opponent in Nevada MORE does.

“I couldn't be elected anything now 'cause I just don't like embarrassing people,” Clinton told “CBS Sunday Morning.”

“My mother woulda whipped me for five days in a row when I was a little boy if I spent all my time badmouthing people like this,” Clinton told CBS’s Mo Rocca.

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Trump has often publicly hit his opponents hard and still refers to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump rallies in Nevada amid Supreme Court flurry: 'We're gonna get Brett' Trump: 'Good news' that Obama is campaigning again Trump boosts Heller, hammers 'Wacky Jacky' opponent in Nevada MORE as “Crooked Hillary,” a nickname he popularized during the 2016 presidential election.

The “lock her up” chant that came to characterize his campaign rallies is often cited when referencing the heavy animosity Trump created toward the Democratic presidential nominee.

"There's a Trump supporter here in town that — I walked past his house with my dogs. He had a 'lock her up' poster in his front window. And I said to him, 'If you're gonna do that to my wife, you make sure the prisons are comfortable. Cause you're gonna have a lot of company of your supporters in there,' " Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonTrump, GOP regain edge in Kavanaugh battle Presidential approval: It's the economy; except when it's not Hypocrisy in Kavanaugh case enough to set off alarms in DC MORE told CBS.

"And he said, '[former President] Obama and Hillary started the second Civil War.' So, there's division. But underneath that, there's a core of fundamental decency that can be really skewed when people feel abused, left out, or looked down on," the former president added.

Clinton during the interview also responded to Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandTeen girls pen open letter supporting Kavanaugh accuser: We imagine you at that party and 'see ourselves' Poll: Most Massachusetts voters don't think Warren should run for president in 2020 The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — GOP again has momentum on Kavanaugh rollercoaster MORE’s (D-N.Y.) assertion that he should have stepped down from office after his affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky was made public.

"You have to really ignore what the context was," Clinton said. "But, you know, she’s living in a different context. And she did it for different reasons. But I just disagree with her."