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Graham: I'm 'not so sure' McCain is right that a majority of Americans back free trade

Graham: I'm 'not so sure' McCain is right that a majority of Americans back free trade

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSaudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP Suspects in journalist's disappearance linked to Saudi crown prince: report Overnight Defense: Trump worries Saudi Arabia treated as 'guilty until proven innocent' | McConnell opens door to sanctions | Joint Chiefs chair to meet Saudi counterpart | Mattis says Trump backs him '100 percent' MORE (R-S.C.) took a jab at Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainComey donates maximum amount to Democratic challenger in Virginia House race Live coverage: McSally clashes with Sinema in Arizona Senate debate Is there difference between good and bad online election targeting? MORE (R-Ariz.) on Sunday, saying he was "not so sure" about McCain's remarks on Saturday that a majority of Americans favor free trade.

"I'm not so sure John's right about where America is on trade," Graham told ABC's George Stephanopoulos on "This Week." 

"The [Sen.] Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersFive takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's debate showdown Live coverage: Cruz faces O'Rourke in Texas debate showdown Saudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP MORE [I-Vt.] element of the Democratic Party doesn't stand for free trade. Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBudowsky: Closing message for Democrats Election Countdown: Dems outraise GOP in final stretch | 2018 midterms already most expensive in history | What to watch in second Cruz-O'Rourke debate | Trump raises 0M for reelection | Why Dems fear Avenatti's approach GOP mocks Clinton after minor vehicle collision outside Mendendez campaign event MORE said she would get out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership if she had become president. There is a movement in our party that Trump's seized that got him the nomination, and eventually became president of the United States," Graham continued. "So I'm not so sure a majority of Americans believe that globalization and free trade is in our interests," he continued.

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"I believe that. John McCain believes it, but the reason we're having these problems here at home, Brexit, Italy, there's a movement all over to look inward not outward and I think it's a mistake, but I'm not sure most Americans agree with John McCain and Lindsey Graham." 

Graham's comments come after McCain took to Twitter Saturday night to slam President Trump for his threat to slap new tariffs on Canada and his decision to pull his endorsement of a joint communique signed with other Group of Seven (G-7) members at this weekend's summit in Canada. 

"To our allies: bipartisan majorities of Americans remain pro-free trade, pro-globalization & supportive of alliances based on 70 years of shared values. Americans stand with you, even if our president doesn’t," McCain said. 

McCain was responding to a pair of tweets the president sent earlier Saturday while he was en route to Singapore for a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

"Based on Justin’s false statements at his news conference, and the fact that Canada is charging massive Tariffs to our U.S. farmers, workers and companies, I have instructed our U.S. Reps not to endorse the Communique as we look at Tariffs on automobiles flooding the U.S. Market!" Trump said in a tweet. 

Trudeau had announced just hours earlier that all seven nations at the G-7 summit had signed on to the joint statement.

Trudeau's office responded to Trump on Saturday, saying the prime minister had been consistent with the U.S. leader. 

"The Prime Minister said nothing he hasn’t said before — both in public, and in private conversations with the President," the Prime Minister's Office said in a statement.