Schiff: There's 'plenty of evidence' of collusion 'in plain sight'

Schiff: There's 'plenty of evidence' of collusion 'in plain sight'
© Greg Nash

Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh and his accuser will testify publicly Russia probe accelerates political prospects for House Intel Dems Trump to declassify controversial text messages, documents related to Russia probe MORE (D-Calif.) said Sunday that he believes there's evidence "in plain sight" that President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: I hope voters pay attention to Dem tactics amid Kavanaugh fight South Korea leader: North Korea agrees to take steps toward denuclearization Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' MORE colluded with the Russians.

"I think there’s plenty of evidence of collusion or conspiracy in plain sight," Schiff said on CBS's "Face the Nation."

The congressman was responding to assertions from White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayThe Memo: Kavanaugh firestorm consumes political world Conway: Kavanaugh accuser 'should not be ignored’ George Conway rips Trump over tweet about Obama's '57 states' gaffe MORE that Trump's claims of a "witch hunt" and "hoax" refer specifically to claims he was elected with the help of Russia, not the broader investigation into Russian influence campaigns.

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Schiff disputed that special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE has thus far not presented any evidence of collusion. However, he acknowledged that the evidence may not be enough to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Trump colluded with Russia.

Schiff has been among the most outspoken critics of Trump on the issue of Russian interference in the 2016 election. He blasted the president on Sunday for his refusal to unequivocally condemn Russian President Vladimir Putin over the issue during a summit between the two presidents last month, and warned it could encourage Russia to continue influencing future elections.

"As long as Russia interferes on Donald Trump’s side in the midterms, Vladimir Putin can count on the president not to call him out," Schiff said.

In an unusual move, the White House sent national security adviser John Bolton, Director of National Intelligence Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsDem lawmakers slam Trump’s declassification of Russia documents as ‘brazen abuse of power’ Nunes: Russia probe documents should be released before election The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by Better Medicare Alliance — Cuomo wins and Manafort plea deal MORE, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenInvestigation into FEMA head referred to prosecutors: report Gowdy requests FEMA administrator’s travel records amid allegations The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil MORE, FBI Director Christopher Wray and National Security Agency Director Gen. Paul Nakasone to the White House briefing last week to detail their agencies' efforts to address election meddling.

Each official specifically called out Russia and cautioned that they continue to see Russian efforts to interfere. 

Trump, however, has cast doubt on that conclusion. He drew significant backlash after he met with Putin in July, when Trump noted Putin's "powerful" denials of Russian interference.