Gowdy: Declassified documents unlikely to change anyone's mind on Russia investigation

Gowdy: Declassified documents unlikely to change anyone's mind on Russia investigation
© Greg Nash

Rep. Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyCNN catches heat for asking candidates about Ellen, Bush friendship at debate The Hill's Morning Report — Arrest of Giuliani associates triggers many questions Trump says Gowdy can't join his legal team 'for a couple months' MORE (R-S.C.) said Sunday that the documents President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren defends, Buttigieg attacks in debate that shrank the field Five takeaways from the Democratic debate in Ohio Democrats debate in Ohio: Who came out on top? MORE ordered declassified related to special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE's investigation are unlikely to change anyone's views on the probe.

Gowdy said on CBS's "Face the Nation" that "99.9 percent" of the documents Trump ordered declassified are unrelated to the president.

"I generally am on the side of transparency, with the caveat do nothing that jeopardizes national security or impacts our relationship with our allies," said Gowdy, the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

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"I've seen all of it, and with the exception of one document, I don’t think anybody’s mind is going to be changed when they read this stuff," he added.

The White House last Monday said the president had ordered the Justice Department and Office of the Director of National Intelligence to declassify and release a series of documents related to the Russia probe “at the request of a number of committees of Congress and for reasons of transparency." 

Trump on Friday delayed the release of the documents after "key allies" raised concerns.

In a series of tweets, the president said he recently met with Justice Department officials about his request and that they agreed to release the documents, while noting that they expressed concerns that doing so could have a "perceived negative impact" on Mueller's investigation into Russian interference during the 2016 election.

The documents include a highly secret application for a surveillance warrant on former Trump campaign aide Carter Page.

Trump has also asked the Justice Department to release "all text messages" related to the Russia probe, including those from former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyComey says he has a 'fantasy' about deleting his Twitter account after end of Trump term We need answers to questions mainstream media won't ask about Democrats Trump 'constantly' discusses using polygraphs to stem leaks: report MORE and a handful of current and former officials whom conservatives have accused of exhibiting political bias against Trump.

Gowdy on Sunday called it "terrible," "heartbreaking" and "sad" that Trump has often publicly feuded with his own Justice Department, particularly Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump attacks Sessions: A 'total disaster' and 'an embarrassment to the great state of Alabama' Ocasio-Cortez fires back at Washington Times after story on her 'high-dollar hairdo' Trump's tirades, taunts and threats are damaging our democracy MORE.

Gowdy said he understands Trump's frustration that Sessions recused himself from overseeing the Russia investigation, but added that the Justice Department is a branch that depends on objectivity.

"I would prefer that they keep their differences private," Gowdy said.