Dem senator: Kavanaugh confirmation 'underscores' health care, Mueller investigation as key midterm issues

Dem senator: Kavanaugh confirmation 'underscores' health care, Mueller investigation as key midterm issues
© Anna Moneymaker

Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinCan new US Strategy on Women, Peace & Security give women a real seat at the table? Ask Afghan women Maryland lawmakers slam 'despicable' Trump remark about journalists on newsroom shooting anniversary Democrats leery of Sanders plan to cancel student loan debt MORE (D-Md.) said Sunday he believes the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh will serve to underscore what's at stake in next month's midterm elections.

"I think it’s going to boil down to concerns about whether we’re going to protect the gains we’ve made in health care over pre-existing conditions, and we’re concerned about [special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTop Republican considered Mueller subpoena to box in Democrats Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE's] investigation being interfered with," Cardin said on "Fox News Sunday" when asked about the new justice's impact on the midterms.

"Constitutional rights of women, those issues are going to be on the ballot on the midterm and Judge Kavanaugh underscores those issues," he added.

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Cardin, who is up for reelection next month, was critical of Kavanaugh's nomination. He asserted that President TrumpDonald John TrumpCould Donald Trump and Boris Johnson be this generation's Reagan-Thatcher? Merkel backs Democratic congresswomen over Trump How China's currency manipulation cheats America on trade MORE did not consult with Democrats and Republicans to come to a mainstream nominee, and instead looked to the Federalist Society to settle on a pick.

"I don’t believe that Justice Kavanaugh is in the mainstream of judicial thought," Cardin said, arguing Kavanaugh has sided with special interests too often.

The Senate confirmed Kavanaugh on Saturday afternoon in a 50-48 vote, with one GOP senator absent and another voting "present." Every Democrat opposed Kavanaugh's nomination except for Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Dems open to killing filibuster in next Congress Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand MORE (D-W.Va.).

Kavanaugh became the second justice nominated by President Trump to take a seat on the court, following Justice Neil Gorsuch.

The bitter fight over Kavanaugh’s confirmation came after multiple women accused the judge of sexual misconduct. Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford testified late last month over allegations that he sexually assaulted her during a party in the 1980s.

A supplemental FBI background investigation found no corroboration of the claims, Republicans said, while Democrats argued that the review of the allegations was too brief and failed to interview key witnesses.