Bipartisan senators doubt ruling striking down ObamaCare

A federal judge’s ruling that the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional was met with skepticism on Sunday from a bipartisan group of senators, who expressed doubt that the ruling will be upheld. 

The lawmakers were at odds with the White House with that prediction, as White House aide Stephen Miller predicted Sunday that the case will end up in front of the Supreme Court and the ruling will be upheld.

U.S. District Court Judge Reed O'Connor ruled Friday that the health-care law's individual mandate is unconstitutional and said the rest of the law is also unconstitutional because the mandate can’t be separated from the law.

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The Affordable Care Act, also known as ObamaCare, will remain in effect while the ruling is appealed. 

Democratic Sens. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTrump blasts Pelosi for wanting to leave country during shutdown The Senate should host the State of the Union Dem senators debate whether to retweet Cardi B video criticizing Trump over shutdown MORE (N.Y.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinTrump AG pick: I won't be 'bullied' by anyone, including the president Live coverage: Trump AG pick grilled on Mueller probe at confirmation hearing Senate Dems set to take aim at new Trump attorney general pick MORE (Ill.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean Klobuchar5 takeaways from Barr’s testimony Klobuchar dismisses mock campaign logo as something from 'very enthusiastic supporter' Grandson's note to Barr during confirmation hearing goes viral MORE (Minn.) harshly criticized the ruling Sunday and vowed to fight back against it, while GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Defense: Trump unveils new missile defense plan | Dems express alarm | Shutdown hits Day 27 | Trump cancels Pelosi foreign trip | Senators offer bill to prevent NATO withdrawal McConnell blocks bill to reopen most of government Bipartisan senators reintroduce bill to prevent Trump from withdrawing from NATO MORE (Maine) and Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntMcConnell: Senate won't override Trump veto on shutdown fight Senate immigration talks fall apart Emergency declaration option for wall tests GOP MORE (Mo.) acknowledged the possibility it will be overturned.

Schumer, during an interview on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” called it an "awful ruling” and pledged that Democrats in the Senate would urge congressional intervention in the case. 

“We're going to fight this tooth and nail. And the first thing we're going to do, when we get back there in the Senate, is urge — put a vote on the floor urging an intervention in the case,” he said.

“A lot of this depends on congressional intent. And if a majority of the House and a majority of the Senate say that this case should be overturned, it'll have a tremendous effect on the appeal,” Schumer added.

Klobuchar called the ruling “absurd” and called on lawmakers to work to improve the health-care law.

“There's many things we can do. But right now with an administration in place that seems bound and determined to take away people's health care, we have to protect the ability of people to have their health care even exist,” she said on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

One member of the Trump administration, Miller, said it will be up to Democrats to work with Republicans “once ObamaCare is ultimately struck down.”

Miller predicted during an interview on “Face the Nation” that O’Connor’s ruling would end up in front of the Supreme Court and said the “likeliest outcome” is that the higher court will rule the law unconstitutional.

“We've always known that ObamaCare was unconstitutional,” he said. “The more important question is whether Democrats are going to work with Republicans once ObamaCare is ultimately struck down, which we believe it will be, to come up with a replacement plan that protects pre-existing conditions.”

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump to meet with top North Korean official to discuss 'fully verified' denuclearization NASA preps for 'Armageddon' style asteroid threat — but with far less drama Gingrich calls BuzzFeed Trump-Cohen report 'equivalent of tabloids you buy at the grocery store' MORE has touted the ruling as a victory, writing in a tweet on Friday that the ruling was "great news for America."

But even Republican senators voiced doubt Sunday that the ruling will survive after an appeal.

Blunt said on NBC’s “Meet the Press” that the ruling will either be “quickly dismissed” by a circuit court or there will be a “long period of time” before the circuit court makes a ruling. 

He added that he thinks the ruling “means we're going to continue to debate this.”

“ObamaCare was a poorly thought-out plan, really poorly, poorly implemented to start with, that's had lots of negative impact on lots of families,” he said.

Collins, the other Republican senator to weigh in on Sunday, was particularly critical of O'Connor’s ruling, which she called “far too sweeping” during an appearance on ABC’s “This Week.”

Collins added that the judge could have “taken a much more surgical approach” by only dealing with the individual mandate.

"He could have taken a much more surgical approach and just struck down the individual mandate and kept the rest of the law intact,” she said. “I believe it will be overturned.”