Graham says he'll ask FBI director about reported investigation into whether Trump was working for Russia

Graham says he'll ask FBI director about reported investigation into whether Trump was working for Russia
© Greg Nash

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump says he'll '100 percent' veto measure blocking emergency declaration Overnight Defense: Dems tee up Tuesday vote against Trump's emergency declaration | GOP expects few defections | Trump doubles number of troops staying in Syria to 400 On The Money: Dems set Tuesday vote on Trump's emergency declaration | Most Republicans expected to back Trump | Senate plots to avoid fall shutdown drama | Powell heading before Congress MORE (R-S.C.) said Sunday that he intends to ask FBI Director Christopher Wray whether the bureau opened a counterintelligence investigation regarding the possibility that President TrumpDonald John TrumpAverage tax refunds down double-digits, IRS data shows White House warns Maduro as Venezuela orders partial closure of border with Colombia Trump administration directs 1,000 more troops to Mexican border MORE was a Russian agent.

The senator, who serves as the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, called a New York Times report that the FBI launched an inquiry into whether Trump was working for Russia after the president fired former bureau chief James ComeyJames Brien ComeyRosenstein: My time at DOJ is 'coming to an end' Five takeaways from McCabe’s allegations against Trump FBI’s top lawyer believed Hillary Clinton should face charges, but was talked out of it MORE "astonishing," but cast skepticism on its findings.

"I, for one, don’t trust what I read in The New York Times," he said on "Fox News Sunday," arguing the source of the story may have an agenda.

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"Having said all that, I‘m going to ask the FBI director was there a counterintelligence investigation opened up regarding the president as being a potential agent of the Russians," Graham continued. "I find it astonishing, and to me it tells me a lot about the people running the FBI, [former Deputy Director Andrew] McCabe and that crowd."

"So if this really did happen, Congress needs to know about it," he continued. "And what I want to do is make sure how could the FBI do that? What kind of checks and balances are there?"

According to the Times, Comey's firing caused such concern among law enforcement that officials began probing if Trump was a threat to national security or secretly carrying out anti-American agendas on behalf of Russian officials.

In an interview with NBC in 2017, Trump cited the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election as part of his reasoning for firing Comey. He has since offered conflicting explanations for the decision.

The president responded to The New York Times report by lashing out at Comey and the special counsel's investigation into Russian interference.

Asked on Fox News on Saturday night whether he is or has ever worked for Russia, Trump called it "the most insulting thing" he's ever been asked, but did not directly answer.