McCarthy to meet with Steve King about white supremacy remarks: 'Action will be taken'

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyMcCarthy: Pelosi appointing members of Jan. 6 panel who share 'pre-conceived narrative' Kinzinger denounces 'lies and conspiracy theories' while accepting spot on Jan. 6 panel Pelosi taps Kinzinger to serve on Jan. 6 panel MORE (R-Calif.) pledged Sunday to take action in response to Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingPence to visit Iowa to headline event for congressman Former Steve King challenger on rural voters in GOP states: 'They hate Democrats' First Democrat announces Senate bid against Iowa's Grassley MORE's latest inflammatory comments in which the Iowa Republican questioned why the terms “white nationalist” and “white supremacist” were offensive.

McCarthy condemned the comments, and said on CBS's "Face the Nation" that he will meet with King on Monday to discuss the matter.

"Action will be taken," he said. "I’m having a serious conversation with Congressman Steve King on his future and role in this Republican Party."

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"There is a number of things you’ll see that is taking place," he continued. "But I will not stand back as a leader of this party, believing in this nation that all are created equal, that that stands or continues to stand and has any role with us."

McCarthy did not cite specific potential actions, but lawmakers have floated censuring King or removing him from committee assignments as possible responses to the lawmaker's comments. 

King has on multiple occasions drew condemnation and backlash for racist remarks and association with far-right groups.

In an interview with The New York Times published last week, King asked how language like "white nationalist" and "white supremacist" became offensive.

He later sought to distance himself from those comments, saying in a House floor speech that he's not "anti-immigrant."

King tweeted in 2017 that “we can't restore our civilization with somebody else's babies.”

Last year, King met with Austria's Freedom Party, a group founded by a former Nazi SS officer and whose leader was involved in neo-Nazi circles. During a meeting with the group, King reportedly asked, "What does this diversity bring that we don’t already have?”

Iowa state Sen. Randy Feenstra (R) announced a primary challenge against King this week, saying that “we don’t need any more sideshows or distractions.” A second Republican, Bret Richards, also told the Des Moines Register that he plans to run against King.