O'Rourke: Being a white male not a disadvantage in 2020 Dem field

O'Rourke: Being a white male not a disadvantage in 2020 Dem field
© Greg Nash

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeHillicon Valley: O'Rourke proposal targets tech's legal shield | Dem wants public review of FCC agreement with T-Mobile, Sprint | Voters zero in on cybersecurity | Instagram to let users flag misinformation O'Rourke proposes holding tech platforms accountable for hate speech The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape MORE acknowledged on Sunday that he's benefitted from certain advantages throughout his life as a white man, but that he does not view that as a disadvantage in the 2020 race.

"I would never begin by saying I'm at any disadvantage at all," O'Rourke said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"As a white man who has had privileges that others could not depend on or take for granted, I've clearly had advantages over the course of my life," he continued. "I think recognizing that and understanding that others have not, doing everything I can to ensure that there is opportunity and the possibility for advancement and advantage for everyone is a big part of this campaign and a big part of the people who comprise this campaign."

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O'Rourke praised the diversity in background and experience of the field of candidates seeking the Democratic 2020 in nomination before noting that he brings some qualities that others don't.

The El Paso Democrat noted that he's the only candidate running from the U.S.-Mexico border area and the only one who ran for state office in a traditionally Republican state.

"So there are some things, perhaps, that, you know, will be different about this candidacy, from the candidacy of others," he said. "If that's better, if that's worse, I don't know. I leave it to the voters to decide."

O'Rourke launched his presidential campaign last week, ending months of speculation and joining Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenAre Democrats turning Trump-like? Manufacturing shrinks, raising questions for Trump Volatile presidential polls spark new round of anxieties MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisAre Democrats turning Trump-like? Volatile presidential polls spark new round of anxieties Conservative commentator rips Shapiro over criticism of people with multiple jobs MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharPoll: Nearly 4 in 5 say they will consider candidates' stances on cybersecurity The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Native American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment MORE (D-Minn.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination We need a climate plan for agriculture MORE (D-N.J.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersVolatile presidential polls spark new round of anxieties GOP memo deflects some gun questions to 'violence from the left' British Bookmaker: Warren has replaced Biden as Democratic primary favorite MORE (I-Vt.), among others, in seeking the Democratic Party’s 2020 presidential nomination.

O'Rourke served three terms in Congress before an unsuccessful bid to unseat Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrump moves forward with F-16 sale to Taiwan opposed by China The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape O'Rourke says he will not 'in any scenario' run for Senate MORE (R-Texas) last year.

He drew criticism upon launch of his campaign for his comments that his wife, Amy, raises their children "sometimes" with his help. O'Rourke has pledged to be more mindful about how he talks about his family.