O'Rourke: Being a white male not a disadvantage in 2020 Dem field

O'Rourke: Being a white male not a disadvantage in 2020 Dem field
© Greg Nash

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeOvernight Energy: Warren wants Dems to hold climate-focused debate | Klobuchar joins candidates rejecting fossil fuel money | 2020 contender Bennet offers climate plan O'Rourke says he would 'absolutely' do Fox News town hall CNN announces four more town halls featuring 2020 Dems MORE acknowledged on Sunday that he's benefitted from certain advantages throughout his life as a white man, but that he does not view that as a disadvantage in the 2020 race.

"I would never begin by saying I'm at any disadvantage at all," O'Rourke said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"As a white man who has had privileges that others could not depend on or take for granted, I've clearly had advantages over the course of my life," he continued. "I think recognizing that and understanding that others have not, doing everything I can to ensure that there is opportunity and the possibility for advancement and advantage for everyone is a big part of this campaign and a big part of the people who comprise this campaign."

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O'Rourke praised the diversity in background and experience of the field of candidates seeking the Democratic 2020 in nomination before noting that he brings some qualities that others don't.

The El Paso Democrat noted that he's the only candidate running from the U.S.-Mexico border area and the only one who ran for state office in a traditionally Republican state.

"So there are some things, perhaps, that, you know, will be different about this candidacy, from the candidacy of others," he said. "If that's better, if that's worse, I don't know. I leave it to the voters to decide."

O'Rourke launched his presidential campaign last week, ending months of speculation and joining Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Memo: Trump faces steep climb to reelection Feehery: A whole new season of 'Game of Thrones' Overnight Energy: Warren wants Dems to hold climate-focused debate | Klobuchar joins candidates rejecting fossil fuel money | 2020 contender Bennet offers climate plan MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Memo: Trump faces steep climb to reelection California Democrats face crisis of credibility after lawsuits Feehery: A whole new season of 'Game of Thrones' MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharFox's Brit Hume fires back at Trump's criticism of the channel Overnight Energy: Warren wants Dems to hold climate-focused debate | Klobuchar joins candidates rejecting fossil fuel money | 2020 contender Bennet offers climate plan O'Rourke says he would 'absolutely' do Fox News town hall MORE (D-Minn.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Sanders pledges to only nominate Supreme Court justices that support Roe v. Wade From dive bars to steakhouses: How Iowa caucus staffers blow off steam MORE (D-N.J.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Memo: Trump faces steep climb to reelection California Democrats face crisis of credibility after lawsuits Fox's Brit Hume fires back at Trump's criticism of the channel MORE (I-Vt.), among others, in seeking the Democratic Party’s 2020 presidential nomination.

O'Rourke served three terms in Congress before an unsuccessful bid to unseat Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCruz slams Jim Carrey's 'vicious, angry' painting of Alabama governor after abortion ban Eye-popping number of Dems: I can beat Trump 'SleepyCreepy Joe' and 'Crazy Bernie': Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults MORE (R-Texas) last year.

He drew criticism upon launch of his campaign for his comments that his wife, Amy, raises their children "sometimes" with his help. O'Rourke has pledged to be more mindful about how he talks about his family.